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CITATIONS

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CITATIONS

RECEIVED BY MEMBERS OF THE 308TH INFANTRY

HEADQUARTERS 77TH DIVISION,
A.E.F.

August 2nd, 1918.
General Orders No. 14

The following Officers and Enlisted Men are announced as having distinguished themselves by gallant and meritorious conduct:

1ST LIEUT. L. WARDLAW MILES, 308th Infantry-in order to correct the disposition of his platoon walked along the parapet during a heavy gas projector attack on June 24, 1918, encouraging his men by his coolness and bravery.

SERGEANT JOHN T. E. MONAHAN, No. 1707790, Co. B, 308th Infantry-in order to encourage and make the proper disposition of the men of his command, went from post to post during a heavy artillery barrage on June 24, 1918, taking short cuts over the open ground, to the utter disregard of his own personal safety.

SERGEANT GEORGE STRASSLE, No. 17xo853, M. G. CO., 308th Infantry-in command of a Machine Gun Section did, on June 24, 1918, get his teams to their guns during a barrage and with one man stood by his gun firing during the bombardment, showing coolness and bravery.

CORPORAL RUDOLPH WISSEL, No. 171o863, M. G. CO., 308th Infantry, did, on June 24, 1918, bring his machine gun team to its post through a bombardment and fired continuously until his gun jammed. He then remedied the stoppage under fire until his gun was hit and destroyed.

PRIVATE I ST CL. N ICHOLAS J. CAMERA, No. 17 1 0877, M. G. Co., 3o8th Infantry, on June 24, 1918, while on sentry duty remained alone and fired unaided about seven hundred rounds with his rifle until the piston of his gun bent, showing bravery under heavy fire.

PRIVATE EDWARD SCALA, No. 1677646, Co. B., 3o8th Infantry, a gas sentinel, during a gas projector attack on June 24, 1918, entered a dug-out after his rifle had been shot from his hands, awakened all the soldiers in the dugout and returned to his post to continue sounding the alarm.

PRIVATE JOHN ENSWENGER, No. 1707882, Co. B, 308th Infantry --on June 24, 1918, although gassed continued to perform his duties as a runner throughout an attack showing coolness and unhesitating devotion.

This order will be read to all organizations at the first assembly formation after its receipt.

By command of Major General Duncan:-

J. R. R. HANNAY,
Colonel, N. A.
Chief of Staff.

November 3rd, 1918. General Orders No. 35.

I desire to record in the General Orders of this Division a tribute to the valorous conduct of the following Officers and Enlisted Men who have distinguished themselves by their splendid courage, service and sacrifice:

CAPTAIN JAMES F. WAGNER, M.C., attached to 308th Infantry -behaved with conspicuous gallantry on the afternoon of October 5, 1918. In the course of an attack on the enemy's lines north of L'Homme Mort in the Argonne Forest, did leave his first aid station and go to the aid of a wounded soldier who was bleeding to death and who had been deserted by his bearers and was lying within two yards of the firing line in a position which was swept by machine gun fire, and did under such machine gun fire, bind up the wounds of the soldier and did obtain assistance and carry him to a place of safety.

CAPTAIN L. S. BRECKINRIDGE, 3o8th Infantry-in command that time of the regiment, on October 5th and 6th, 1918, in a position north of L'Homme Mort in the Argonne Forest, did on both occasions under the enemy's fire, personally direct the movement of his troops, moving from place to place and exposing himself without regard to personal safety, in his efforts to break through the enemy's line and did encourage his officers and men by his personal example in their efforts to break the enemy's line.

1ST LIEUT. BERNARD M. BURNS, Co. L, 308th Infantry-behaved with conspicuous gallantry, on or about October 8th,1918. In the course of an attack on the enemy's lines, north of L'Homme Mort in the Argonne Forest, after being painfully wounded, he refused to be evacuated and he continued to direct the operations of his company until ordered from the field personally by the Brigade Commander.

November 14th, 1918.
General Orders No. 39.

2ND LIEUT. D. S. McGUIRE, 308th Infantry-who behaved with conspicuous gallantry on the morning of October 16, 1918, in an attack on the enemy's lines north of the River Aire, between Chevieres and St. Juvin, and showed marked aggressiveness and ability in placing and handling his machine guns while holding the position taken across the St. Juvin-Grand Pre Road from 3 A.M. to 6 P.m. This officer's disposition and use of his machine guns operated very largely to make the position tenable.

SERGEANT JOSEPH A. BOFFA, No. 1708294, Co. D, 308th Infantry -who led his men through heavy machine gun and artillery barrages until severely wounded during the advance through the Argonne Forest, near Binarville.

SERGEANT HERBERT E. ROCH, No. 1708408, Co. D, 308th Infantry-who on September 27th, 1918, in the Argonne Forest, S. E. of Binarville, led his platoon against two machine gun nests at great risk of his own life, thereby reducing their fire and aiding in the advance of his Battalion. He was killed in action during the advance.

SERGEANT HERMAN G. ANDERSON, No. 1707546, Co. A, 308th Infantry-this soldier was with a detachment in the Argonne Forest, near Binarville, from October 2nd to 7th, 1918. While his Company was with-. out an officer, he took command, reorganized his detachment and kept the men in perfect order, exposing himself to heavy machine gun and shell fire. With utter disregard of his personal safety, he rendered first-aid to the wounded in his own and other companies.

CORPORAL JOHN DAVIS, No. 1708283, Co. D, 308th Infantry-who, in the Argonne Forest, east of Binarville, led his patrol through a line of machine gun nests on October 7th, 1918, with a disregard for his personal safety thereby reducing their fire and aiding in the advance of his Battalion.

CORPORAL MAX KOEPPE, No. 1708333, Co. D, 308th Infantry, who during the advance of his Battalion through the Argonne Forest, east of Binarville, led his squad against four machine gun nests, reduced their fire and continued the advance until he was killed in action on October 5th, 1918.

PRIVATE WILLIAM ZAPKE, No. 17o8431, Co. D, 3o8th Infantry- who, on October 5th, 1918, in the Argonne Forest, east of Binarville, showed great bravery, after having been surrounded by the enemy, refused to surrender and fought until he was killed.

PRIVATE GEORGE H. ROWLEY, No. 1679964, Co. D, 3o8th Infantry, who was with a patrol of his company on their flank in the advance through the Argonne Forest southeast of Binarville. He stuck to his post under heavy machine gun and artillery fire with an absolute disregard for his personal safety until he was killed on September 29th, 1918.

PRIVATE FRANK G. S. ERICKSON, No. 343H6, Co. H, 3o8th Infantry-who displayed extraordinary heroism in action in the Argonne Forest, near Binarville, between October 3rd and October 8th, 1918. This soldier was with his Company from October 2nd to October 8th when that Company, together with other companies of the 1st and 2nd Battalions of this regiment, were surrounded by the enemy and cut off from communications with friendly troops. During this period he was a runner between his Company and Battalion Headquarters. Though completely without food during all this period, he cheerfully and courageously performed his duties as runner. During a heavy attack by the enemy on October 3rd he carried messages from his Company Commander to Battalion Headquarters under heavy fire from machine guns and trench mortars. He succeeded in delivering his message and in guiding supporting troops to the left flank which was then being subjected to heavy pressure by the enemy. On succeeding days of the siege, this soldier continued to perform his duties over exposed places and in full view of the enemy and always under heavy machine gun fire which raked the position on the least exposure. These duties he performed in absolute disregard of his personal safety.

November 3oth, 1918. General Orders No. 42.

MAJOR C. W. GAYLORD, (then captain), 3o8th Infantry-for his action in personally assisting, of his own volition the delivery of five ration trucks to a point just outside of St. Juvin, on the night of October 14th, 1918, following the capture of the town in the late afternoon. From Fleville to St. Juvin the road was under machine gun fire and was constantly and heavily shelled, repeatedly covering the ration trucks with dirt and stones. Nevertheless, this officer accompanied the trucks as far as the road would permit and personally notified the troops of the arrival of the rations, and assisted in the bringing back of the five ration trucks, although one truck was badly ditched and was righted under a burst of shell fire.

December 2oth, 1918. General Orders No. 48.

CORPORAL OSCAR DAHLOOFF, No. 1710339, 3o8th Infantry, Co. M-who during the operations of September 26th-27th in the Argonne Forest near Le Mort Homme carried food from his post to a wounded man until he could be evacuated, having to pass through heavy machine gun fire to reach him.

CORPORAL OSCAR DAHLOFF, No. 1710339, CO. M, 308th Infantry, PRIVATE A. RABINOWITZ, No. 1708916, Co. F, 308th Infantry, PRIVATE GEORGE W. COLLINS, No. 1709699, CO. I, 308th Infantry -who on September 8th, 9th and ioth on the River Aisne operated, under enemy machine gun and one-pounder fire, a Divisional 0. P. in a very exposed position of the front line.

CORPORAL OSCAR DAHLOFF, No. 1710339, CO. M, 308th Infantry, PRIVATE 1ST CL. A. RABINOWITZ, No. 1708916, Co. F, 3o8th Infantry-who on August 25th left cover in the Bois de Cochelet and while under heavy enemy barrage of artillery fire repaired telephone lines to the Divisional 0. P. which had been cut by shell fire.

January 4th, 1919. General Orders No. 1

1ST LIEUT. CHARLES SMITH, 3o8th Infantry-was in charge of the Regimental Transport from its entrance in the line in the Baccarat Sector on June 23rd, 1918, through the work of the Regiment on the Vesle, on the Aisne, in the Foret D'Argonne, up to the withdrawal of the Division from the line at the Meuse River on November 18th, 1918. Lieut. Smith, by his untiring devotion to duty and supervision of the work of the regimental transport, aided in every way for the success of our troops and his prompt and efficient handling of the transport service of the regiment demonstrated extreme faithfulness to the work demanded of him.

1ST. LIEUT. JOHN F. D. BEBELL, 3o8th Infantry-personally supervised the forwarding of supplies to his Regiment throughout its operations in the Baccarat Sector, Vesle Sector and on the Aisne, being daily in danger of shell fire.

1ST LIEUT. WILLIAM J. WILKINSON, 308th Infantry-personally supervised the forwarding of supplies to his Regiment throughout its operations in the Baccarat Sector, Vesle Sector and on the Aisne, being daily in danger of shell fire.

The following named soldiers all of Headquarters Company, 308th Infantry:-
SGT. GERALD F. McCARTHY 1710568
SGT. CHARLES J. CAHILL 1710567
CPL. AARON RISHIN 1710100
CPL. H. CHARLETON FICKER 1710562
CPL. JOHN V. McGUIRE 171o62I
CPL. WILLIAM F. PERINE 1710630
CPL. JOHNSON F. EVANS 1710539
PVT. EDWARD J. McMENAMIE 1657350
PVT. HAROLD L. WILSON 1682971
PVT. GEORGE W. DONOVAN 1681337

These men had been with the Signal Platoon of the Regiment in all the organization's most severe engagements, and have served with courage and faithfulness to duty at all times. Sgt. McCarthy, Sgt. Cahill and Corp. Rishin in charge of telephone stations; Corporals Ficker and McGuire directing T.P.S. communication; Corporal Perine, wire supplies; Corporal Evans, panel work; Privates MeMenamie and Donovan, linemen; and Private Wilson in charge of pigeons, have rendered invaluable and courag-eous service in maintaining liaison in action and under fire.

CORPORAL JOHN H. TEWES, No. 1716126, and Corporal William J. Wellington, No. 171o639, both of Headquarters Company, 308th infantry-at Chery Chartreuvre, on the Vesle Sector, these two men had complete charge of maintaining all telephone lines to the forward-stations, and although working the greater part of the time under intense shell fire, they repaired breaks with utter disregard of personal safety and danger, maintaining communication throughout.

CORPORAL THOMAS H. MURPHY, No. 171o695, Headquarters Company, 308th Infantry, was in charge of a forward telephone station located just outside of Ville Savoye, on the Vesle Sector, which was a very important link in the forward system of communication. For three days he worked constantly to keep the line open and in operation. During the night he went out innumerable times, many of them under heavy shellfire, to repair the wires and maintain communication, and continually, regardless of personal risk and danger, kept the liaison intact, manifesting throughout a high courage and steadfastness to duty.

PRIVATE 1ST CLASS JAMES MURRAY, No. 1707670, Co. A, 308th Infantry-this soldier displayed great bravery and disregard of his Own safety when acting as a company runner when this regiment was holding a. sector on the Vesle River near Ville Savoye from August 23rd to August 25th, 1918. Again in the advance through the Forest of Argonne, Private 1st Class Murray repeatedly carried messages from his company commander to troops in the front line positions, under machine gun and artillery fire.

January 10, 1919. General Orders, NO. 2.

CAPTAIN EDWIN N. LEWIS, 308th Infantry-this officer has served with the regiment during all its severe campaigns, and on numerous occasions has displayed extreme bravery and heroism under shell and machine gun fire. On or about August 25, 1918, near Ville Savoye, Capt. Lewis, then 1st Adjutant and Adjutant of the 1st Battalion, 3o8th Infantry, was on duty with his battalion during its relief by the 2nd Battalion, 307th Infantry, when a company of the latter organization came under most intense enemy shell fire, one officer and several men being killed and a number wounded. Lieut. Lewis, with utter disregard of his own safety, left the battalion P.C. and aided personally in evacuating wounded, helping to carry himself one of the wounded men more than a kilometer, although constantly under shell fire. Again on September 29, 1918, during the advance of the 1st battalion, 308th Infantry, in the Argonne, Capt. Lewis, then 1st Lieutenant and in command of one of the front line companies pushed forward with great vigor and courage despite heavy enemy resistance. Liaison with the units on the left was lost, however, and a number of the enemy, supported by machine guns, attacked his company from the flank and in the rear. Lieut. Lewis, in shifting his position to meet the attack exhibited great personal courage and bravery, continually exposing himself to constant machine gun and rifle fire, with utter disregard of his own safety and danger. He succeeded in executing a turning movement and consolidated his position.

CAPTAIN ALLIE D. MORGAN, M.C., 308th Infantry-when a First Lieutenant and Surgeon for the 1st Battalion, 308th Infantry, between August 15 and August 22, 1918, in the support line in front of Chery Chartreuve in the Vesle Sector, this officer displayed the highest type of personal bravery and devotion to duty. Daily he went out under shellfire to attend to the wounded and to cheer and encourage the men. On Or about August 20, 1918, the Battalion was subjected to a particularly heavy bombardment of gas and high explosive shells. Lieutenant Morgan left his aid station and went to that section of the Battalion position where the fire was heaviest and the casualties most numerous and there gave first aid treatment with utter disregard of his own safety. He insisted upon being present personally so that prompt medical attention might be given to men seriously wounded by shell fragments. This medical officer has not been absent from duty one day during all the operation of this regiment in France. During the advance through the Forest of Argonne from September 26th to October 15, 1918, he was warned on several occasions that his advance aid station was so far forward that both himself and his assistants would be in danger from sniper and machine gun fire. Captain Morgan refused to move back knowing that owing to the difficulties in evacuating wounded his presence forward with the companies would result in prompt attention for the most serious cases.

1ST LIEUT. JAMES J. HALLIGAN, Senior Chaplain, 308th Infantry -this officer has rendered faithful and distinguished services in the performance of the difficult duties of his office during all the operations of this regiment in France. On the night of August 23rd, 1918, Chaplain Halligan, displayed a remarkable devotion to duty and utter disregard of his own safety by coming to Ville Savoye in the outpost zone on the Vesle River to arrange for the burial of four officers and two enlisted men who had been killed by shell fire at the entrance to a natural cave on the hillside above the town and in direct observation from the enemy. Owing to unusually heavy enemy artillery activity the Chaplain was forced to abandon plans for the burials that night. On the following night he appeared again, organized a detail when the command post of the battalion commander was under artillery fire, and supervised, personally, under shell fire, and in the moonlight, the interment of the bodies in the hillside near the cave. Again in the Argonne from September 29th to October 1st, 19M Chaplain Halligan showed the same untiring devotion to duty and disregard of his own safety when he searched for two days through the forest until he found the body of Lieutenant Colonel Frederick E. Smith, 308th Infantry, and arranged for an appropriate funeral in the cemetery of the ruined church at La Harazee. By his encouraging talks with the men, his cheerful and sympathetic letters to anxious relatives at home, and his general cheerfulness under all the hardships incident to field service, this officer contributed immeasurably to the morale of his regiment.

1ST LIEUT. CARL F. KOENIG, M.C., 308th Infantry--on September 5th, 1918, one kilometer northeast of Blanzy-les-Fismes, during the attack of the 3rd Battalion, 308th Infantry, on Serval, the troops were subjected to heavy converging machine gun fire and later to artillery bombardment. Lieutenant Koenig, accompanying the first wave of the attack, rallied the men to further efforts when the line had become broken under fire. He showed the utmost disregard of his own safety, administering first aid to the wounded until he, himself, was seriously wounded by the explosion of a shrapnel shell.

2ND LIEUT. J. B. SCHRIDER, 308th Infantry-on or about October 15th, 1918, on the north side of the Aire River, near St. Juvin. Lieut. Schrider, while in command of a flanking party of 8 men, crawled out into the open under extremely heavy machine gun fire after one man had been killed and two wounded and for a period of nearly two hours, kept up, incessant and extremely accurate rifle fire against machine gun nests along the St. Juvin, Grand Pre Road until the 37mm cannon could be brought up. This action was done absolutely without cover of any sort, and by drawing the fire upon themselves greatly aided the companies of this Battalion who had, taken position on the hill commanding the St. Juvin-Grand Pre Road.

2ND LIEUT. SHERMAN W. EAGER, 308th Infantry-this officer was with the 1st and 2nd Battalions, 308th Infantry, when they were surrounded by the enemy near Charlevaux in the Argonne Forest from October 3rd to October 7th, 1918. He exposed himself to heavy machine gun and artillery fire with utter disregard of his own personal safety, directing his men in a cool and fearless manner during the frequent enemy attacks on the position of the beleaguered battalions.

2ND LIEUT. CECIL H. STRAUB, 308th Infantry-during the operations in the Argonne and in the advance to the Meuse, this officer was on,", duty constantly with the Supply Company, rendering faithful and meritorious service in a position of great responsibilities. Lieutenant Straulb. displayed on frequent occasions the highest type of personal bravery walking in front line areas without regard of his own safety. He established advance ration dumps and distributed supplies under artillery and machine gun fire, fearlessly exposing himself in the execution of his duty.

2ND LIEUT. DEWITT 0. MORGAN, 3o8th Infantry-on November 6th, 1918, this officer displayed extraordinary bravery and leadership when he conducted a patrol into the village of Stonne, one kilometer ahead of the attacking infantry. The patrol caused two German machine gun posts to, flee, thereby aiding, materially, in the liberation of the town which was held by the enemy when the patrol was made. Caught in a heavy artillery bombardment while making a reconnaissance in the village, Lieutenant Morgan, with extreme coolness and courage, directed his men to safety at great risk to his own life.

SERGEANT MAJOR CLARENCE R. ROESCH, No. 1709312, 308th Infantry-this N.C.O. was Sergeant Major of the 2nd Battalion at the time the 1st and 2nd Battalions of the 308th Infantry were surrounded and cut off in the Argonne Forest, October 3rd to October 7th, 1918. During the five days of separation, Sgt. Major Roesch aided materially in keeping liaison between the various companies, exposing himself continually to snipers and machine gun fire, regardless of personal danger. On numerous occasions at the imminent risk of his own life, he gave first aid to the wounded during shell and machine gun fire, and assisted them in reaching positions of shelter and comparative safety. After several unsuccessful attempts to deliver a message to Regimental Headquarters by the runners, Sgt. Major Roesch volunteered to attempt to break through and was on his way to carry out this mission when the relief arrived.

SERGEANT MAJOR ERCOLE L. SOZZI, No. 17 1 0448, 308th Infantry -for extraordinary bravery under shell fire displayed on or about August 17th, 1918, near St. Martin when he was on duty with a liaison patrol. When communication was interrupted by intense shelling, this soldier, then a private in Company M, 308th Infantry, volunteered to deliver a message of great importance to the Battalion P.C. Crossing an area of one kilometer in plain view of the enemy, he succeeded in his mission, bringing back with him as much food as he could carry for his comrades. Again at Ville Savoye on or about August 29, 1918, while acting as guide for a ration party to the front line, which had to cross an area subjected to heavy shelling, this soldier with utter disregard of his own safety, pointed out the most advantageous position for his men. He refused to take cover himself until all the men in the ration party had been cared for. His coolness and courage under fire set an inspiring example to his comrades.

SERGEANT RICHARD BREW, No. 1709791, Co. K, 3o8th Infantry -on or about August 22nd, 1918, near Ville Savoye, when his company was attacked by the enemy, this soldier conducted himself with extraordinary bravery, and rendered invaluable service to his platoon and company. When the supply of grenades was exhausted, he carried German bombs to his men and under heavy shell fire, instructed them how to throw the potato mashers against the attacking Germans. Up to the time he was wounded he traveled up and down the lines encouraging and assisting his men. His coolness and fearlessness under fire and his utter disregard for his own personal safety, set a high example for his platoon, and assisted materially in repelling the attack of the enemy.

SERGEANT CHARLES MATELUSCH, No. 1711206, M.D., 308th Infantry-on the morning of September 5th, 1918, during an advance of the 3rd Battalion, 308th Infantry, near Blanzy-les-Fismes. The Battalion Surgeon, having been wounded dangerously, this non-commissioned officer ran to him with stretcher bearers, dressed his wounds under heavy shell fire and machine gun fire, and personally supervised his transportation for more than one kilometer across an open field to the first aid station. Again on September 12th, 1918, near Revillon, forced to act independently of a Medical Officer, he improvised an aid post in a ramshackle shed, dressed the wounds of fifteen men while exposed to shell fire and with a detail of Medical Detachment men as stretcher bearers personally supervised the transportation of the wounded to the ambulances.

SERGEANT CHARLES GILMARTIN, No. 1707641, Co. A, 308th Infantry-on November 6th, 1918, this noncommissioned officer displayed great bravery and inspiring leadership when he accompanied his platoon leader on a patrol into the village of Stonne, one kilometer in advance of the attacking infantry. The patrol caused two German machine gun posts to flee, thereby aiding materially in the liberation of the town which was held by the enemy at the time the patrol was made. Caught in a heavy artillery bombardment while making a reconnaissance in the village, Sergeant Gilmartin, with extreme coolness and courage, directed his men to safety at great risk to his own life.

SERGEANT DANIEL TUCKER, No. 1709809, Supply CO., 3o8th Infantry-on or about September 14th, 1918, near Revillon when as non-commissioned officer in charge of the 3rd Battalion Transport, he wanes ordered to haul cookers and water carts from the front line position over looking the Aisne Canal. Caught in a heavy artillery barrage on the Barbonval-Blanzy-les Fismes Road, Sergeant Tucker had to abandon the attempt to move the transport that night. On the following morning, however, in plain view of the enemy and under a constant artillery and machine gun fire, he persisted in the attempt, supervised personally the hauling out of the cookers and water carts one at a time, and by his splendid leadership and absolute disregard of intense enemy activity carried out his orders.

SERGEANT BERNARD GILLECE, No. 1708617, Co. E, 308th Infantry-this noncommissioned officer was a member of Company B when the 1st and 2nd Battalions, 308th Infantry, were cut off and surrounded by the enemy near Charlevaux in the Forest of Argonne from October 3rd to October 7tb, 1918. In many attempts to break through the enemy. lines and get word to the relieving companies, Sergeant Gillece served with high courage and devotion to duty, exposing himself frequently to hostile fire regardless of his personal safety. Only when it proved a physical impossibility to get through the enemy lines would he relent in his splendid efforts. He returned on numerous occasions with invaluable information regarding enemy works and positions. His conduct was an inspiration to all his comrades.

SERGEANT GERALD G. KIRCHNER, No. 1709285, Co. H, 308th Infantry-was in charge of the Battalion Scouts, 2nd Battalion, during the period that the organization was cut off and surrounded in the Argonne Forest, October 3rd to 7th, 1918. On numerous occasions he led various reconnaissance patrols out in front of his lines to locate the enemy positions, and on these continually displayed a good judgment and courage worthy of the highest mention. Throughout, whether under machine gun, shell or trench mortar fire, he manifested a keen sense of devotion to duty, disregarding at all times his own personal safety and danger.

SERGEANTHERBERT C. ELLUM, No. 1709385, Co. H, 3o8th Infantry-this sergeant has been with the regiment in every engagement since its first trip to the Baccarat Sector, and throughout has displayed a high degree of devotion to duty and courage under fire. During the severe fighting in the Argonne from October 1st to 5th, 1918, he was of invaluable aid to the regiment in bringing up ration and ammunition details in the face of grenade and machine gun fire.

SERGEANT JOHN J. SEXTON, No. 1710577, Stokes Mortar Platoon, Headquarters CO., 308th Infantry-during the advance through the Forest of Argonne from Sept. 26th-Oct. 15th, 1918 this noncommissioned officer displayed remarkable bravery, disregard of his own welfare, and devotion to duty when in command of a section in the Stokes Mortar Platoon. Although seriously ill with dysentery and pyorrhea he refused to be evacuated and continued to place his guns to assist in clearing away enemy opposition. This noncommissioned officer's teeth were in such a condition that he derived practically no protection from a gas mask. Throughout the operations of his company in France, however, he begged to be assigned to the most advanced positions, although he knew that he ran great risk of being a gas casualty. He was an inspiration to, and a real leader of his men.

SERGEANT RAYMOND GILL, No. 1708394, Co. D, 308th Infantry (deceased)--on the night of August 21St, 1918, near Ville Savoye this non-commissioned officer showed extreme personal bravery under intense artillery fire when he assisted in the evacuation of a wounded officer from a natural cave in the hillside in plain view of enemy. On August 24th, 1918, when his company was advancing against the enemy across the Vesle River, Sergeant Gill, though wounded severely, refused to go to the rear for medical attention and insisted upon taking out a patrol to capture a sniper who was in a position to pick off our men. While leading this patrol he was killed.

SERGEANT MARK C. HAGERMAN, No. 1709048, Co. G, 308th Infantry, this soldier then a corporal, displayed extraordinary heroism when his company, with the 1st and 2nd Battalions, 308th infantry, was surrounded by the enemy near Charlevaux: in the Argonne Forest from October 3rd to October 7th, 1918. During all the enemy attacks he was ever watchful of the position of his men, directing them in a cool and fearless manner, although in so doing he exposed himself to heavy machine gun and artillery fire. He also volunteered his services to attempt to break through the enemy lines in order to report conditions and bring aid.

CORPORAL LEONARD E. ALLEN, No. 1680022, Headquarters Co., 308th Infantry-this N.C.O. during the advance to the Aisne on September 12, 1918, maintained the telephone wires and kept the lines open from Regimental Headquarters, outside of Blanzy, to the advanced Battalion P.C., although continually under heavy shell fire and in direct observation of the enemy. As he repaired the breaks, he was sniped at by Boche one-pounders, and on several occasions had hardly finished making a splice and completing connections when another bursting shell tore up the wire. Despite this, he kept communication open, displaying the greatest bravery and heroism throughout. Again, in the Argonne, from September 29th to October 1st, 1918, he was in charge of a Battalion telephone station and in maintaining the lines exposed himself time and again with utter disregard of machine gun fire and his own safety.

CORPORAL JOHN F. HUBNER, No. 1710351, CO- M, 308th Infantry-this noncommissioned officer displayed extraordinary daring and coolness under fire on or about September 28th, 1918, near Depot de Machines in the advance through the Forest of Argonne. While on a reconnaissance patrol he discovered an enemy machine gun nest, which had been holding up the advance of his company. He immediately opened fire on the enemy, displaying absolute disregard of his own safety. After remaining in No Man's Land until long after dark he returned with valuable information of the enemy positions for his Battalion Commander.

CORPORAL LUKE ARCHER, No. 1709574, CO. I, 308th Infantry -this noncommissioned officer displayed extraordinary daring and coolness on or about September 28th, 1918, near Depot de Machines in the advance through the Forest of Argonne. While on a reconnaissance patrol he discovered an enemy machine gun nest, which had been holding up the advance of his company. He immediately opened fire on the enemy displaying absolute disregard of his own safety. After remaining in No Man's Land until long after dark he returned with valuable information of the enemy positions for his Battalion Commander.

CORPORAL JOHN B. REARDON, No. 1677923, Headquarters Co., 308th Infantry-this noncommissioned officer has been in charge of getting up rations from the dumps to the company kitchens since this regiment arrived in France. Throughout his service he has displayed remarkable personal bravery and devotion to duty, never failing to get food to his company regardless of difficulties. In the Vesle Sector from August 14th to August 26th, 1918, he delivered rations each night to Chery Chartreuve and to Les Pres Farm, although the road between these points was frequently under terrific shellfire. During the advance to the Aisne from September 3rd to September 15th, 1918, he brought limbers nightly from Blanzy-les-Fismes to Barbonval under shellfire. During the advance in the Forest of Argonne he had charge of the establishment and rationing for a forward kitchen near Le Moulin de L'Homme Mort. More than six hundred hot meals were served daily from this kitchen although the enemy directed artillery fire against the place. Through the splendid service of Corporal Reardon the morale of his company was stimulated, the men always feeling confident that hot meals would be served regardless of weather, enemy activities, or other difficulties.

CORPORAL FRED R. ROMEREIN, No. 1429363, Co. E, 3o8th Infantry-on September 3rd, 1918, on the Vesle River, west of Fismes, dur-ing a terrific bombardment of the company position, during which many men were severely wounded and killed, Corporal Rornerein displayed unusual gallantry by going about amongst the men of his company and personally seeing that they were taking every advantage of cover. With total disregard for his own safety he assisted the wounded in every way and made frequent checks of the casualties reporting same to his Commanding Officer. His fine judgment and coolness during the heavy shelling was a great inspiration to every man in his company.

CORPORAL PETER MAHER, No. 1709394, Co. H, 308th Infantry (deceased)-this corporal has been with the regiment in every engagement since arrival in France, displaying throughout all operations great courage under fire and a high devotion to duty. During the advance through the Forest of Argonne, he was calm and faithful to duty under heavy grenade and machine gun fire. He met his death on October 2nd, 1918, while attempting to get rations forward to the 1st Battalion, 308th Infantry.

CORPORAL DANIEL GALLAGHER, No. 1707729, Co. A, 308th Infantry-in the advance through the Argonne Forest near Binarville on September 28th, 1918, this soldier, although armed with a Chauchat rifle, volunteered to go ahead of his platoon under machine gun fire to capture a German prisoner whom he chased for 200 yards. On the following day Corporal Gallagher, alone, pursued four Germans, wounding one of them, and returning to his platoon only after ammunition for his Chauchat rifle had been exhausted.

CORPORAL JAMES J. ROONEY, No. 1708146, CO. C, 308th Infantry-for extraordinary bravery and devotion to duty displayed -on August 23rd, 1918, in an attack on the enemy positions along the Vesle River near Ville Savoye. This noncommissioned officer was one of the first to volunteer in a squad of automatic riflemen to accompany a sergeant and advance across the river in the open to draw fire from the enemy while two platoons of C Company executed a flanking maneuver against two enemy machine guns. Advancing fearlessly under heavy machine gun and artillery fire, Corporal Rooney displayed the highest type of personal bravery. He was wounded severely when on this patrol.

WAGONER ALEXANDER V. BRENNAN, No. 1709836, Supply CO., 308th Infantry-for extraordinary bravery and persistence in duty displayed near Blanzy-les-Fismes on or about September 5th, 1918, while he was driving " C " Company's water cart forward to the First Battalion position. A shrapnel shell burst so close to the cart that one mule was killed and the other injured. Showing great coolness under intense artillery fire, Wagoner Brennan unhitched the injured animal, returned to the corral for another team, went back to the cart, and continued on his way. On this night the road to Blanzy was subjected to a particularly heavy artillery bombardment.

PRIVATE 1ST CLASS ALBERT H. KENT, No. 1709336, Co. H, 308th Infantry-Private 1st Class Kent was a Company runner for Company H, 308th Infantry, acting as a Battalion runner for the 2nd Battalion of that Regiment when it was at Ville Savoye, during the period August 12th to 16th, 1918. He was an exceptionally faithful runner under any and all conditions, manifesting a disregard for personal danger. He performed his duties with coolness and speed, even when under heavy shellfire, as was usually the case. He was conspicuous for volunteering to take more than his share of the dangerous tasks that fell to the Battalion runners, thus setting a very good example as well as inspiring his fellow runners.

PRIVATE 1ST CLASS MORGAN L. CHUBB, No. 1709328, Co. H, 308th Infantry-Private 1st Class Chubb was a company and battalion runner in which capacity he showed unusual coolness and bravery under heavy fire. During the latter part of August, 1918, while the Regiment was on the Vesle Sector, he carried messages from Les Pres Farm to the 307th Infantry Headquarters. This necessitated his crossing open country under direct observation of the enemy and under continual sniping by Boche one-pounders. Despite this, he stuck faithfully to his job and manifested a high degree of devotion and steadfastness to duty.

PRIVATE 1ST CLASS JOHN SWEENEY, No. 1683654, Headquarters CO., 308th Infantry--during the fighting on the Vesle and in the advance to the Aisne, Private 1st Class Sweeney was assigned to telephone work to and from front line troops that necessitated his going constantly under fire, both shell and machine gun, in keeping the wires open. During the preparations for the attack on the Vesle front, August 30th to September 3rd, 1918, he worked for five days on a line running near Mont. St. Martin and Ville Savoye, that was under direct enemy observation and continually sniped at by Boche one-pounders. By consistent high courage and disregard of personal danger, he kept this wire open at a time when communication with the front was vitally essential. He was severely wounded on September .5th,1918, near Blanzy, advancing with the line, battalion, to which he was attacked as telephone line man.

PRIVATE JOHN ISAKSEN, No. 1708142, CO. C, 3o8th Infantry-for extraordinary bravery and devotion to duty displayed on August 23rd, 1918, during an attack against the enemy positions along the Vesle River near Ville Savoye. This soldier volunteered in a squad of automatic riflemen to accompany a noncommissioned officer and advance across the river in the open to draw fire from the enemy while two platoons of C Company executed a flanking maneuver against two enemy machine guns. Although nearly overcome by heat Private Isaksen showed extreme courage under heavy machine gun and artillery fire, sticking to his position until rescued by his comrades.

PRIVATE GEORGE W. BARHYDT, No. r677505, Headquarters Co., 308th Infantry-on September 14th, 1918, during the attack on Revillon, this soldier displayed extraordinary courage and devotion to duty. Having lost his rifle in action early in the day, he did, when his platoon was
ordered to follow Company M, 308th Infantry, for the purpose of digging it in, unhesitatingly seize a stick, and advance with it as his only weapon. He later armed himself with the rifle taken from a dead comrade and showed extreme bravery under fire until wounded severely by a shell fragment which wound caused the loss of the sight of one eye.

PRIVATE PATRICK O'CONNOR, No. 1681198 (deceased) and PRIVATE PAUL F. ANDREWS, No. 1709198 (deceased), Co. G, 308th Infantry-these two enlisted men were killed in action while G Company and other companies of the 1st and 2nd Battalions, 308th Infantry, were surrounded by the enemy in the Forest of Argonne near Charlevaux from October 3rd to October 8th, 1918. During the time while the advance troops were cut off, they displayed personal courage and a devotion to duty worthy of the highest praise.

PRIVATE FRANK H. WALLACE, No. 3138145, Co. A, 308th Infantry-for extraordinary heroism and disregard of his own safety displayed in the Forest of Argonne near Binarville on October 1st, 1918, when three men who were helping him carry his wounded platoon commander to a place of safety were killed by shell fire. In spite of terrific fire from enemy trench mortars and artillery, Private Wallace kept cool and stayed with the wounded lieutenant until assistance came. He afterwards guided under shellfire two more wounded soldiers to the first aid station, all the while showing the highest type of personal courage and devotion to duty.

PRIVATE STEPHEN WANDOWLOWSKY, No. 1707696, Co. A, 308th Infantry-during the advance through the Forest of Argonne near Binarville on September 28th, jqi8, he went to the rescue of a wounded sergeant, dressed his wounds and alone, carried him to safety across an open path which was under heavy machine gun fire. When his company was surrounded by the enemy with the 1st and 2nd Battalions, 308th Infantry, near Charlevaux from October 3rd to October 8th, 1918, Private Wandowlowsky displayed extreme bravery and utter disregard of his own welfare. By his coolness and courage he steadied the men on his post and assisted in driving off several enemy attacks on the position.

PRIVATE SAMUEL H. CHESTER, No. 1711192, Medical Detachment, 308th Infantry--on September 3rd, 1918, on the Vesle River, near Fismes, while Company E, 308th Infantry, was under terrific shell fire fr6m enemy guns, this soldier moved about with utter disregard for his own safety and although every man was taking advantage of available cover, he continued to apply first aid to make the wounded men comfortable. His heroism was an excellent example to every man. On all occasions Private Chester performed his duties in the line with total disregard for his own safety.

PRIVATE LOUIS CALMENSON, No. 17o8853, Co. F, 308th Infantry -for extraordinary heroism in action near La Harazee in the Forest of Argonne on September 29th, 1918, when his company, together with other companies of the 1st and 2nd Battalions, 308th Infantry, were surrounded for thirty-six hours by detachments of the enemy who cut all communication with friendly troops in support. This soldier volunteered to ascertain the location of an enemy machine gun, which was causing casualties in the isolated companies. With utter disregard of his own safety, Private Calmenson advanced alone, with his hands up as though he intended to surrender, to engage in conversation with a German who came out to meet him. Detecting his purpose, the German fired, wounding Private Calmenson severely. He killed the German with his revolver, and in spite of his wound, managed to crawl back to his company with information of the enemy position which was of great value in silencing the machine guns.

PRIVATE JOHN W. HAMMILL, No. 1678936, Headquarters Co., 308th Infantry--on September 14th, 1918, near R6villon on the Aisne Canal this soldier displayed extraordinary heroism and loyalty when he volunteered and did accompany his commanding officer in crossing a slope in plain view of the enemy and under heavy shell fire, to bring in a severely wounded comrade.

The following named soldiers, Co. H, 308th Infantry--during the night of August 22-23, 1918, under intense shell fire, these men carried machine gun ammunition from Chery Chartreuve, through Mont St. Martin, to the position held by the Machine Gun Battalion above Ville Savoye. Many of the party were lost, but these men made repeated trips all through the night and up to noon the next day. Their work showed a bravery and pluck, worthy of high praise:
PRIVATE 1ST CLASS ISADORE SPIEGEL No. 1710728.
PRIVATE JOHN DELMONT, No. 1682961
PRIVATE HARRY WASSERMAN, No. 1709436
PRIVATE ALEXANDER ROYFE, No. 1709556.

February 2nd, 1919. General Orders No. 10.

SERGEANT WILLIAM ADDIE, No. 1710543, CO. C, 3o8th Infantry -on August 23rd, 1918, in an attack on the enemy on the Vesle River near Ville Savoye, this noncommissioned officer volunteered, with a squad of Chauchat automatic riflemen, to advance in the open and draw fire from the enemy while e two platoons of C Company executed a flanking maneuver against two enemy machine guns. Although five of his men became exhausted from heat, being rendered practically unconscious, and one man was wounded severely, Sergeant Addie accomplished his mission under heavy machine gun and artillery fire. Through his coolness and splendid leadership he returned safely, bringing all his men back across the Vesle River to safety.

PRIVATE 1ST CLASS LEO H. DOWNS, No. 1679971, CO. C, 308th Infantry-for extraordinary bravery and devotion to duty displayed on August 23rd, 1918, during an attack against enemy positions along the Vesle River near Ville Savoye. This soldier volunteered in a squad of automatic riflemen to accompany a noncommissioned officer and advance across the river in the open to draw fire from the enemy while two platoons from C Company executed a flanking maneuver against two enemy machine guns. Although nearly overcome by the heat, Private 1st Class Downs showed extreme courage under heavy machine gun and artillery fire, remaining at his position until rescued by his comrades.

PRIVATE PAUL SEGAL, No. 17o8231, CO. C, 3o8th Infantry--on August 23rd, 1918, during an attack against the enemy positions along the Vesle River near Ville Savoye, this soldier volunteered in a squad of automatic riflemen to accompany a noncommissioned officer and advance across the river in the open to draw fire from the enemy while two platoons of C Company executed a flanking maneuver against two enemy machine guns. Although nearly overcome by the heat, Private Segal showed extreme courage under heavy machine gun and artillery fire, sticking to his position until rescued by his comrades.

February 21st, 1919. General Orders No. 14.

MAJOR FRANCIS M. WELD, 3o8th Infantry-during the advance to the Meuse, this officer commanded the 2nd Battalion, 3o8th Infantry. His splendid efforts in looking out for the men and untiring work in pushing the advance, were an inspiration to all concerned. He was wounded on November 5th, 1918, near Oches, when reconnoitering in front of his troops who had been held up by fire from a German machine gun nest.

1ST LIEUT. ARTHUR H. ROBINSON, 308th Infantry-for extreme bravery and utter disregard for his own safety displayed on or about October 5th, 1918, in the Argonne Forest near Binarville. While the 3rd Battalion was attempting to break through the enemy lines it became necessary to get an important message to Company I on the extreme left Rank of the Battalion position. Three runners had been either killed or wounded in attempting to accomplish this mission. Lieut. Robinson volunteered to carry the message. He crossed an open space more than 200 yards while under machine gun and artillery fire and succeeded, by his remarkable courage, in delivering the message to the company commander for whom it was intended.

2ND LIEUT. HERBERT F. GEROLD, 308th Infantry--on or about October 15th, 1918 when the 3rd Battalion, 3o8th Infantry had taken up a Position on the Army Corps line along the St. Juvin-Grand Pre Road, it was learned that an enemy machine gun crew had worked in around the right flank and was opening fire on our troops from the rear. Lieut. Gerold accompanied by Sergeant Harry June, CO. K, 3o8th Infantry, succeeded in creeping up close to the German machine gun crew, rushed at them, and captured four prisoners and the gun, thereby relieving his company from the danger of fire from the rear.

BATTALION SERGEANT MAJOR WALTER J. BALDWIN, No. 1710601, Headquarters CO., 308th Infantry---on October 5th, 1918, when companies of the 1st and 2nd Battalions, 308th Infantry, were cut off and surrounded by the enemy in the Forest of Argonne near Moulin de Charlvaux, Sergeant Major Baldwin, then Corporal in charge of runners at Major Whittlesey's headquarters, displayed extraordinary heroism in leaving his funk-hole, under heavy shell fire, and going to the assistance of a comrade who lay wounded in an exposed place. Corporal Baldwin, without regard to his own safety, carried the wounded man to a place, which offered better shelter. Throughout the advance in the Argonne and in particular during the period while the troops were surrounded by the enemy, Corporal Baldwin displayed remarkable bravery, devotion to duty, and indifference to hardship, his example steadying and encouraging the Battalion runners who were in his charge.

SERGEANT LAWRENCE M. OSBORNE, No. 1707849, Co. B, 308th Infantry (deceased)-for extreme bravery, devotion to duty, and inspiring leadership while acting as an officer in command of a platoon in the advance from the Vesle to the Aisne and later in the Forest of Argonne. This noncommissioned officer, called suddenly from a Supply Sergeant' s duties to take command of a platoon in action, owing to the existing shortage of officers and sergeants in the company, distinguished himself by his for remarkable qualities of leadership. He displayed absolute disregard for his own safety, exposing himself frequently to shell and machine gun fire to look after his men and assist them in finding shelter. Under the most trying circumstances, when rations were low and intense suffering was caused by exposure to rain in the Argonne, Sergeant Osborne's indifference to hardship set a high example to his platoon. He was of invaluable assistance to the Lieutenant commanding the company. While serving faithfully with the small detachment of " B " Company men which were cut off and surrounded with companies of the 1st and 2nd Battalions, 3 8th Infantry near Charlevaux: from October 3rd to 8th, 19 18, Sergeant Osborne was killed by shell fire. His services to his company, both as supply sergeant and later as platoon leader in the front line, called forth the highest admiration from his officers and his comrades.

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