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Citations Awarded to the 308th Infantry


HISTORY
of
THE 308th INFANTRY

By
L. Wardlaw Miles
1927
Citations Awarded to the 308th Infantry


MEDALS OF HONOR

AWARDED TO MEMBERS OF THE 3o8TH INFANTRY'

BENJAMIN KAUFMAN, first sergeant, Company K, 308th Infantry. For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action with the enemy in the Forest of Argonne, France, October 4, 1918. He took out a patrol for the purpose of attacking an enemy machine gun which had checked the advance of his company. Before reaching the gun he became separated from his patrol and a machine-gun bullet shattered his right arm. Without hesitation he advanced on the gun alone, throwing grenades with his left hand and charging with an empty pistol, taking one prisoner and scattering the crew, bringing the gun and prisoner back to the first-aid station.

GEORGE G. McMURTRY, captain, 3o8th Infantry. For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy at Charlevaux, in the forest D'Argonne, France, October 2 to 8, 1918. Capt. McMurtry commanded a battalion which was cut off and surrounded by the enemy, and, although wounded in the knee by shrapnel on October 4 and suffering great pain, he continued throughout the entire period to encourag6 his officers and men with a resistless optimism that contributed largely toward preventing panic and disorder among the troops who were, without food, cut off from communication with our lines. On October 4, during a heavy barrage, he personally directed and supervised the moving of the wounded to shelter before himself seeking shelter. On October 6 he was again wounded in the shoulder by a German grenade, but continued personally to organize and direct the defense against the German attack on the position until the attack was defeated. He continued to direct and command his troops, refusing relief, and personally led his men out of the position after assistance arrived before permitting himself to be taken to the hospital on October 8. During this period the successful defense of the position was due largely to his efforts.

L. WARDLAW MILES, Captain, 308th Infantry. For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action with the enemy near Revillon, France, September 14, 1918. Capt. Miles volunteered to lead his company in a hazardous attack on a commanding trench position near the Aisne Canal, which other troops had previously attempted to take without success. His company immediately met with intense machine-gun fire, against which it had no artillery assistance, but Capt. Miles preceded the first wave and assisted in cutting a passage through the enemy's wire entanglements. In so doing he was wounded five times by machine-gun bullets, both legs and one arm being fractured, whereupon he ordered himself placed on a stretcher and had himself carried forward to the enemy trench in order that he might encourage and direct his company, which by this time had suffered numerous casualties. Under the inspiration of this officer's indomitable spirit his men held the hostile position and consolidated the front line after an action lasting two hours, at the conclusion of which Capt. Miles was carried to the aid station against -his will.

FRED E. SMITH, (deceased) lieutenant colonel, 3o8th Infantry, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action with the enemy near Binarville, France, September 28, 1918. When communication from the forward regimental post of command to the battalion leading the advance had been interrupted temporarily by the infiltration of small parties of the enemy armed with machine guns, Lieut. Col. Smith personally led a party Of 2 other officers and 10 soldiers, and went forward to reestablish runner posts and carry ammunition to the front line. The guide became confused and the party strayed to the left flank beyond the outposts of supporting troops, suddenly coming under fire from a group of enemy machine guns only 50 years away. Shouting to the other members of his party to take cover, this officer, in disregard of his own danger, drew his pistol and opened fire on the German gun crew. About this time he fell, severely wounded in the side, but, regaining his footing, he continued to fire on the enemy until most of the men in his party were out of danger. Refusing first-aid treatment he then made his way in plain view of the enemy to a hand-grenade dump and returned under continued heavy machine-gun fire for the purpose of making another attack on the enemy emplacements. As he was attempting to ascertain the exact location of the nearest nest, he again fell, mortally wounded.

CHARLES W. WHITTLESEY, major (now lieutenant colonel), 308th Infantry. For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action with the enemy northeast of Binarville, in the forest D'Argonne, France, October 2-7, 1918. Although cut off for five days from the remainder of his division, Maj. Whittlesey maintained his position, which he had reached under orders received for an advance, and held his command, consisting originally Of 463 officers and men of the 3o8th Infantry and of Company K of the 307th Infantry, together in the face of superior numbers of the enemy, during the five days. Maj. Whittlesey and his command were thus cut off, and no rations or other supplies reached him, in spite of determined efforts which were made by his division. On the fourth day Maj. Whittlesey received from the enemy a written proposition to surrender, which he treated with contempt, although he was at that time out of rations and had suffered a loss of about 50 per cent in killed and wounded of his command and was surrounded by the enemy.

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSSES

AWARDED TO MEMBERS OF 308TH INFANTRY

EDGAR W. AKERS, second lieutenant, 3o8th Infantry. For extra-ordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, September 28, 1918. During the advance in the Argonne Forest, France, Lieut. Akers, having been severely wounded, led his platoon in a successful assault on two machine-gun nests, thereby aiding in the advance -of his battalion sergeant.

ALBERT E. ANGIER, first lieutenant, 308th Infantry. For extra-ordinary heroism in action near R6villon, France, September 14, 1918. Although wounded, he continued to lead his men in an attack. By his gallant example he urged them forward through enemy wire to their objective. Even when mortally wounded he continued to direct the consolidation of his position, refusing medical attention in favor of others who had a better chance to live than himself.

HAROLD BATLEY, private, Company C, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Badonviller, France, June 24, 1918. Pvt. Bailey, after two patrols had failed, volunteered and went alone to the grouped combat through the barrage and brought back information of the highest value.

WILLIAM V. BAXTER, private, Medical Detachment, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Revillon, France, September 8, and in the Argonne offensive, September 28, 1918. On September 8, Pvt. Baxter went to the aid of wounded comrades, despite the deadly fire of rifles and machine guns, and after administering to them in a shell hole, he carried the men one at a time to safety. On September 28, after being painfully wounded, he refused to go to the rear until he had rendered first aid to a more seriously wounded comrade.

WILLIAM BEGLEY (Army serial No. 1709131), private, Company G, 308th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Charlevaux, France, October 3-6, 1918. When his battalion was surrounded in the Argonne Forest, October 3-7, Pvt. Begley took charge of his squad, after the corporal had been killed, and, despite the fact that he was wounded in the arm by a machine-gun bullet, encouraged his men through all the attacks Of the four days until he was killed, October 6. Next of kin: Mrs. Margaret Begley, 155 Huntington, Brooklyn, N. Y.

MARTIN BEIFUS (Army serial No. 1710290), sergeant, Company M, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Serval, France, September 12, 1918. During the advance of his platoon he went out alone, and with a Chauchat rifle and grenades drove the enemy out of a trench which was later occupied by our troops. Mortally wounded, he continued to encourage and direct his men in the work of consolidating the position, refusing to be evacuated till this work had been accomplished. Next of kin, Mrs. M. L. Lorance, 5102 Fifth Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y.

HERMAN J. BERGASSE, first sergeant, Company A, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, September 28, 1918. Assuming command of the command after his commanding officer had become a casualty, Sergt. Bergrasse led a formidable attack on an enemy machine-gun emplacement, silencing two guns in the nest and permitting the further advance of his battalion.

RAYMOND BLACKBURN, sergeant Company C, 3o8th Infantry, For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, October 2, 1918. He volunteered and led a reconnaissance patrol, and while returning to his company commander with his information one of the patrol became detached and was in danger of being captured by the enemy. Realizing his comrade's predicament, he rushed to his aid and rescued him, killing two of the enemy and dispersing the others.

GEORGE W. BOTELLE (Army serial No. 1682967), private, Company C, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Charlevaux Mill, France, October 4, 1918. He repeatedly carried messages over ground swept by intense enemy fire. When his battalion had been surrounded and several other runners had been killed or wounded in the attempt, he volunteered to carry a message through the enemy lines to the regimental post of command, being severely wounded in the performance of this mission. Home address: Mrs. Annie Botelle, grandmother, Lakeside Conn.

JAMES W. BRAGG, private, Medical Detachment, 308th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, October 2-7, 1918. He was on duty with a detachment of his regiment which was cut off and surrounded by the enemy in the Argonne Forest, France, for five days. Though he was without food throughout this period, he continued to render first aid to the wounded, exposing himself to heavy shell and machine-gun fire at the risk of his life until he was completely exhausted.

LUCIEN S. BRECKINRIDGE, captain, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Grand Pr6, France, October 14, 1918-All the bridges over the Meuse River having been destroyed by artillery fire, Capt. Breckinridge, who had been ordered to cross the river with his battalion, personally reconnoitered the banks of the river in utter disregard for his own safety until he found a ford. He then led his command across

the stream under intense machine-gun and artillery fire and established a position on the heights of the opposite bank. Home address: Mrs. Lucien S. Breckinridge (wife), io West Eleventh Street, New York, N. Y.

CLIFFORD R. BROWN, private, Company C, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, October 2-7, 1918. During the time when his company was isolated in the Argonne Forest and cut off from communication with friendly troops Pvt. Brown, together with another soldier, volunteered to carry a message through the German lines, although he was aware that several unsuccessful attempts had been previously made by patrols, the members of which were either killed, wounded, or driven back. By his courage and determination he succeeded in delivering the message and brought relief to his battalion.

HAROLD BROWN, (Army serial No. 3130988), private, Company D, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Charlevaux, France, October 4, 1918. When the first two battalions of his regiment had been surrounded by the enemy, Pvt. Brown volunteered to accompany a patrol for the purpose of establishing liaison with the forward troops, knowing from the fate of previous patrols that the mission would probably prove fatal. He was killed as the patrol was attempting unsuccessfully to reach the forward battalions. Next of kin, Mrs. Grace G. Brown (wife), 261o I Street, Bakersfield, Calif.

KENNETH P. BUDD, major, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ville Savoye, France, August 16, 1918. Although his post of command was subjected to continuous and concentrated gas attacks, and despite the fact that he was severely gassed during the bombardment -he refused to be evacuated, remaining for three days to personally super, intend the relief of his battalion and the removal to the rear of men who had been gassed.

JAMES CADDLE (Army serial No. 1680035), private, Company B, 308th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ville Savoye, France, August 23-25, 1918. Pvt. Caddle, a battalion runner, displayed exceptional bravery in carrying numerous messages under heavy artillery fire to the front-line positions, crossing the Vesle River and proceeding for more than a kilometer in plain view of the enemy, over terrain which was continually bombarded with gas and high-explosive shells. Home address: Mrs. Walter J. Caddle (mother), 61 West Ninety-eighth Street, New York, N. Y.

CARMEN CALBI (Army serial No. 1709580), sergeant, Company I, 308th Infantry, 78th Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Grand Pre, France, October 14, 1918. Sergt. Calbi, with two others, made a flank attack upon an enemy machine-gun nest. He rushed through enemy machine-gun fire and captured the gun. Residence at enlistment: 201 East Seventy-fourth Street, Now York, N. Y.

WILLIAM CALLAHAN, sergeant, Company E, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near R6villon, France, September 9, 1918. In order to clean out an enemy machine-gun nest which was holding up the advance of his company, Sergt. Callahan volunteered and, with an officer, crawled through the enemy wire into his lines, killed two of the enemy, and, although their position was discovered and the area was swept by machine-gun fire, he remained with the officer, killed an enemy machine gunner and drove another away with his gun, and finally returned with information concerning the enemy positions.

ROBERT GUNN CARLISLE, second lieutenant, Company L, 3o8th Infantry, 77th Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near San Juvin, France, October 14, 1918. After his platoon had suffered very heavy casualties, Lieut. Carlisle led a group of eight men on a reconnaissance along the Aire River. Encountering enemy machine-gun fire, he gallantly led his group in the attack and completely silenced the enemy fire. Due, in part, to his heroism, his organization was able to cross the Aire River on the following day. Residence at appointment: Aberdeen, Miss.

EDWARD CARTER, sergeant, Company I, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Grand Pre, France, October 14, 1918. When his company was halted by machine-gun fire which threatened to wipe out the entire company, Sergt. Carter led a patrol and charged the nest, and was successful not only in cleaning out the stronghold but in enabling his company to command a more favorable position.

PHILIP CEPAGLIA, private, Company C, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France. October 2-8, 1918. Pvt. Cepaglia was on duty as a battalion runner during the period of six days in which his own and another battalion were surrounded by the enemy in the Argonne Forest, France, and cut off from communication with friendly troops. Although he was without food and toward the end of the period almost exhausted, this soldier carried messages to all parts of the position. Constantly under heavy fire from machine guns and trench mortars, he showed an utter disregard for his own personal safety.

ENOCH CHRISTIANSON, private, first class, Company A, 308th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, October 1, 1918. When the advance of his platoon had been checked by enemy machine-gun fire, Private Christianson deliberately exposed himself to sniper fire in order to locate the position of the sniper who had caused several casualties in his platoon.

THOMAS C. COLLEY, first lieutenant, Company A, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Stonne, France, November 6, 1918. Though wounded, he voluntarily went through shell fire and gave first aid to wounded members of his platoon, thereby receiving additional wounds.

JAMES H. COLLINS, private, Company L, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action west of St. Juvin, France, October 16, 19 18. Pvt. Collins, with another soldier, volunteered to cross a level open space for 6oo yards, swept by converging machine-gun fire, to deliver a message to the front line, undeterred by the knowledge that six other soldiers had been wounded in a similar attempt. Crawling from one shell hole to another, he succeeded in reaching the front line and delivering the message.

ROBBINS L. CONN, first lieutenant, 3o8th Infantry. For extra-ordinary heroism in action near R6villon, France, September 10, 1918. Lieut. Conn volunteered and, with two soldiers, went on a patrol for the purpose of capturing prisoners. They crawled forward to within a few yards of the enemy lines, overpowered two sentries, and succeeded in delivering them to the battalion commander, despite the fact that the enemy put down a heavy barrage of rifle fire and rifle grenades.

FRANCIS CONSIDINE, private, first class, Company A, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near La. Harazee, France, September 26, 1918. As acting corporal, Pvt. Considine was in charge of a group which ran upon an enemy machine-gun nest in a swamp. Although wounded in one foot by a machine-gun bullet and in the other foot by a grenade, he continued to hold his post and encouraged his men until assistance came.

LEROY G. CRONKHITE, second lieutenant, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, September 28-October 1, 1918. In the face of heavy machine-gun fire, Lieut. Cronkhite went forward to within hand-grenade range of the enemy lines and brought back to shelter a soldier who had been severely wounded. Later in the day he went out alone and located a dangerous machine-gun nest, which was thereupon destroyed. Although wounded, Lieut. Cronkhite refused to be evacuated until October 1, when he was ordered to the hospital by the battalion commander. Home address, Mrs. Minnie E. Cronkhite (mother) Selah, Wash.

WILLIAM J. CULLEN, first lieutenant, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, October 2-8, 1918. During the advance of his regiment through the Forest of Argonne, France, Lieut. Cullen led his company, under intense concentration of machine-gun fire, to the day's objective, steadying his men and directing the organization and entrenchment of his position. During the period in which part of the regiment was cut off by the. enemy, he continued to visit his posts and encourage his men under intense concentrations of trench-mortar and machine-gun fire, effectively directing the repulse of attacks on his position. On October 4-5-6 this officer, observing friendly airplanes, left his shelter and went out into a cleared space in plain view of the enemy and under intense machine-gun fire signaled the position to the airplanes. During all this critical time when his company, as well as the battalion, was entirely without food for five days, he displayed coolness, good judgment, and efficiency, furnishing an inspiring example to his men. His gallantry in action contributed materially to the holding of the left flank and the successful resistance made by his battalion.

FORTUNATO Di PASQUALE (Army serial No. 168o69o), private, Company D. 3o8th Infantry, 77th Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ville Savoye, August 13, 1918. During the attack of his company to regain ground in the outpost zone on the Vesle River, Private Di Pasquale found himself holding an important post on the left flank of the company. He advanced across a railroad track in the face of terrific machine-gun fire from the high bank beyond the railroad cut, and, undaunted by enemy fire and with great courage, climbed half way up the steep railroad embankment and aided materially to the success of his company in driving the enemy from their machine-gun emplacement. Private Di Pasquale was killed as he made this advance. Next of kin -Mrs. Josephine Marbila, sister, Archibald, Pa. Residence at enlistment: 2o9 Eleventh Street, Niagara Falls, N. Y.

WOODRUFF W. DOBSON, first lieutenant, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near le Moulin, de l'Homme Mort, France, September 29, 1918. He volunteered and reconnoitered in front of the first-line battalion to secure information regarding enemy machine guns and minnenwerfers which had checked the advance of his organization. He was wounded by a sniper's bullet as he crawled back from this reconaissance, but refused to submit to first aid until he made his report to the battalion commander and informed his men of the enemy's position.

JAMES DOLAN, corporal, Company G, 3o8th Infantry. For extra-ordinary heroism in action near Charlevaux, France. October 3-7, 1918. He was very severely wounded while in charge of his automatic rifle section, which was a unit of a surrounded battalion. After receiving first aid, he resumed his post and remained in command of his section until the
battalion was relieved.

WALTER P. DONOGHUE (Army serial No. 17o8284), sergeant, Company D, 3o8th Infantry, 77th Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Moulin de Charlevaux, in the Argonne Forest, France, October 6, 1918. He was sent out on a patrol to investigate machine-gun fire from the left flank and to the rear of his company's position, and was wounded in the left leg by shrapnel fragments. Upon reporting back to his company commander he refused to be evacuated, but insisted in taking an active and gallant part in four subsequent attacks made to reach a battalion of our troops who were cut off and surrounded by a superior force of the enemy. Home address: 2412 Marion Avenue, New York, N. Y.

RUSSELL L. DuBOIS, private, first class, Medical Detachment, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ville Savoye, France, August 20, 1918. Although suffering acutely from the effects of mustard gas, he refused to be evacuated because of the great need of medical attention among his comrades. For three days he remained at his post, and only went to the rear when ordered to do so by his commanding officer.

JAMES EAST, sergeant, Company A, 308th Infantry. For extra-ordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, September 29, 1918. He volunteered and guided three wounded men to a first-aid station through machine-gun fire. He was wounded while on this mission, but, learning that his company was to make an advance, refused to be evacuated and returned to duty, bringing important information as to the enemy positions.

LEO ENGLANDER (Army serial No. 1708449), private, Company D, 3o8th Infantry, 77th Division. For extraordinary heroism in action on the Vesle River, near Ville Savoye, France, August 23, 1918. He volunteered to go out into No Man's Land to bring in a comrade from his platoon who had been seriously wounded and unable to move. Private Englander reached the man and was about to carry him to safety when he was killed by enemy machine-gun fire. His heroism was an inspiration to the members of his company. Next of kin: Mrs. Sadie Englander Liswood, sister, 8101 Twentieth Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Residence at enlistment: 6o Second Ave., New York, N. Y.

CARMINE FELITTO, corporal, Company D, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, October 4, 1918. When his platoon leader and a small detachment of men were surrounded by the enemy and subjected to a terrific artillery and machine-gun fire, Corpl. Felitto volunteered and brought a message from his lieutenant to the company commander, bravely making his way through the enemy's lines, despite the fact that he had seen other men killed while making the attempt. He brought the first message from the detachment, which had been cut off from the company for 18 hours.

JOHN VINCENT FLOOD, second lieutenant, 308th Infantry, 77th Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Badonviller, France, June 24, 1918. After being severely wounded he continued to direct his platoon with great courage and determination. Residence at appointment: 254 East Sixtieth Street, New York, N. Y.

GEORGE FOX, corporal (1708954), Company F, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near St. Juvin, France, October 15, 1918. Corpl. Fox exposed himself to machine-gun fire to rescue a wounded comrade who lay in an exposed position. While crawling out to bring in his comrade he was under direct enemy observation and bursts of machine-gun fire.

JOSEPH FRIEL, private, Company A, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, October 2-5, 1918. He Was on duty as a battalion runner during the period of six days in which his own and another battalion were surrounded by the enemy in the Argonne Forest, France, and cut off from communication with friendly troops. Although he was without food and, toward the end of the period, almost exhausted, this soldier carried messages to all parts of the position. Constantly under heavy fire from machine guns and trench mortars, he showed an utter disregard for his own personal safety. On the night of October 5, 1918, he was sent to carry a message through the enemy Hnes..-.1 to regimental headquarters. Several other attempts had been made, as this soldier knew, which had resulted in the death or capture of the runners. He made the attempt, but was killed in the performance of his mission by 1, the enemy fire.

JACK D. GEHRIS, private, first class, Medical Detachment, 308th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, October 2 and 5, 1918. Under a heavy enemy barrage he went to the rescue of two severely wounded men and carried them to a place offering scant shelter, where they were forced to remain until aid arrived the next mom-; ing. On October 5, 1918, when a shell struck his first-aid station, killing two and wounding five others, he, although wounded, administered first aid to his comrades before receiving medical attention for himself.

RAYMOND GILL, sergeant, Company D, 3o8th Infantry. For ex-traordinary heroism in action near Ville'Savoye, France, August 24, x9t8. During the advance of his company across the Vesle River, Sergt. Gili, disregarding severe wounds, insisted on leading a patrol to capture a sniper who was occupying a formidable position to fire on our men. While on this precarious mission he was killed.

ALFRED S. GRIFFITHS, captain, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ville Savoye, France, August 18, 1918. While suffering from the effects of gas, Capt. Griffiths led a liaison patrol to the flanking battalion across an open slope and under direct enemy observation, exposed during the whole journey to terrific artillery and machine-gun fire. He remained on duty as battalion adjutant, after all other officers had been evacuated because of the effects of gas, although he had been rendered temporarily speechless and blind by a severe gassing.

SAMUEL D. GROBTUCK, private, first class, Company K, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ville Savoye, France, August 22, 1918. While carrying a message to his battalion commander, asking for reinforcements, he passed through the village of Ville Savoye, filled with mustard gas, and was killed by shell fire while crossing an open field under direct observation of the enemy.

ROBERT K. HAAS, first lieutenant, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near R6villon, France, September 10, 1918. During the attack on Revillon Lieut. Haas voluntarily left his shelter and went across an open slope in full observation of the enemy and under heavy machine-gun fire to the aid of a wounded soldier, bringing him back to our lines for first-aid treatment.

JEREMIAH HEALEY, sergeant, Company G, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Charlevaux, France, October 3-7, 1918. Although wounded on the third day of the battle in the Argonne Forest, Sergt. Healey continually exposed himself to machine-gun and artillery fire while aiding and cheering his men. He also volunteered his services in an attempt to break through the enemy lines and bring aid to his organization.

PATRICK HENDRICHS, private, Company C, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Badonviller, France, June 24, 1918. After being wounded he continued to work his automatic rifle until it was destroyed. He then secured a rifle and continued to fight, and later assisted other wounded before having his own wound dressed.

JACK HERSCHKOWITZ, private, Company C, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, September 29, 1918. In order to obtain ammunition and rations, Private Herschkowitz, with another soldier, accompanied an officer in an effort to reestablish communication between battalion and regimental headquarters. They were attacked by a small party of Germans, but drove them off, killing one. When night came they crawled unknowingly into the center of a German camp, where they lay for three hours undetected. Finally discovered, they made a dash to escape. In order to protect the officer, Private Herschkowitz deliberately drew the enemy fire to himself, allowing the officer to escape. Private Herschkowitz succeeded in getting through and delivering his message the next morning.

EUGENE W. HORTON (Army serial No. 1709854), private, first class, Company K, 3o8th Infantry, 77th Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ville Savoye, France, August 22, 1918. When his company was attacked by greatly superior numbers of the enemy, Pvt. Horton continued to operate his automatic rifle although exposed to heavy machine-gun fire. His gallant conduct was a material factor in the successful repulse of the enemy who were endeavoring to turn the flank of his organization. Residence at enlistment: 18 Lawrence Street, New York, N. Y.

ALGOT JOHNSON, private, Company A, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ville Savoye, France, August 26, 1918. Under heavy fire from the enemy, Pvt. Johnson, accompanied by one man, crossed the Vesle River and silenced a machine gun, which was causing heavy casualties in his company. They killed one gunner and wounded the other.

HENRY KESSLER, private, Company C, 3o8th Infantry. For ex-traordinary heroism in action near Ville Savoye, France, August 23, 1918. He was the first to respond to a call for volunteers to rescue a wounded soldier who had fallen severely wounded while on a patrol. Crawling for-ward through intense machine-gun and artillery fire, he assisted in the rescue, being severely wounded while engaged in the undertaking.

IRVING KLEIN, corporal, Company A, 3o8th Infantry. For repeated acts of extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, September 29, 1918, and Charlevaux, France, October 3-7, 1918. On September 29, after locating the position of three enemy machine guns, he succeeded in silencing one, took up a position against the other two under intense shell fire, and sent back information to his company commander which made it possible to clean out the entire nest. On October 3, although wounded seriously, he continued to assist his men in repulsing the attack of an enemy patrol.

PAUL R. KNIGHT, first lieutenant, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, October 3-5, 1918. Although he had been twice wounded, he led his company in four attempts to cut through a heavy barbed-wire entanglement to capture Hill 205 in the Forest of Argonne, France, in order to reach two battalions of his regiment which had been cut off by the enemy.

STANISLAW KOSIKOWSKI, private, Company C, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, October 2-7, 19x8. During the time when his company was isolated in the Argonne Forest and cut off from communication with friendly troops, Pvt. Kosikow-ski, together with another soldier, volunteered to carry a message through the German lines, although he was aware that several unsuccessful attempts had been previously made by patrols, the members of which were either killed, wounded, or driven back. By his courage and determination he succeeded in delivering the message and brought relief to his battalion.

ANTHONY J. KRUGER, sergeant, Company K, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Wilhelmplatz, France, September 29, 1918. He was ordered to take his platoon and capture a machine gun which was holding up the advance of the company and causing many casualties. Armed with an automatic pistol, he, without hesitation and with utter disregard for his personal safety, charged the machine gun, stopping only when he was rendered unconscious by two bullet wounds in the neck.

ORIE H. LA CROIX (Army serial No. 1683636), corporal, Company A, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, October 1, 1918. When his company commander and first sergeant had been wounded, he rallied the company and continued the advance fearlessly exposing himself to hostile fire and inspiring the men with him by his courage. Home address: Mrs. Adeline La Croix, 6 Park Circle, Milford, Conn.

JOHN C. LENAHAN, private, Company M, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Grand Pre, France, October 14, 1918. When his company was ordered to take a position along the river bank, ,under heavy machine-gun and artillery fire, Private Lenahan, acting first sergeant, made his way from flank to flank, supervising the disposition of the troops. Despite serious wounds received, he completed his mission and reported to his company commander, dying shortly after from the effects of his wounds.

HARRY LINDEN, sergeant, Company H, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ville Savoye, France, August 16, 1918. After all his company officers and first sergeant had been evacuated because of gas, Sergt. Linden assumed command of the company, which was then occupying an extremely precarious position, exposed to an unusually heavy shell and gas bombardment. He remained in command until the company was relieved, and the following night, despite his sufferings from the effects of gas, helped carry up ammunition under intense enemy artillery fire.

IRVING LOUIS LINER, private, Company D, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, October 2-7, 1918. He was a battalion runner, when his battalion was surrounded by the enemy in the forest of Argonne and cut off from communication with friendly troops. He carried messages with great cheerfulness under conditions of stress and under heavy machine-gun and shell fire, at a time when he was exhausted by exposure and hunger, being without food for five days.

ALLAN J. MAcDOUGALL, captain, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Rdvillon, France, September 9, 1918. Capt. MacDougall voluntarily assumed command of a patrol of three men to locate enemy lines and gun positions. Crawling through withering machine-gun fire to within 2o yards of the enemy lines, he encountered two Germans on outpost, whom be killed. Remaining exposed to the enemy for an hour, Capt. MacDougall killed a machine gunner who attempted to take a position in front of him. His entire mission was harassed by perilous machine-gun fire and a constant hand-grenade bombardment.

ARTHUR F. McKEOGH, first lieutenant, 3o8th Infantry, 77th Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, September 29, 1918. In order to obtain ammunition and rations, Lieut. McKeogh, accompanied by two enlisted men, attempted to reestablish communication between battalion and regimental headquarters. When night came they crawled unknowingly into the center of a German camp, where they lay over three hours undetected. Finally discovered, they made a dash to escape, and Lieut. McKeogh, in order to protect his men, deliberately drew the enemy fire upon himself. He succeeded, however, in getting through the enemy lines, delivered his message, and effected the reestablishment of communication. Residence at appointment: 62 East Ninety-third Street, New York, N. Y.

THOMAS F. MARONEY, corporal, Company C, 308th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Badonviller, France, June 24, x918. Although wounded while bringing up ammunition for his automatic rifle team, Corpl. Maroney stayed with his men, encouraging and directing them.

. HOWARD F. MERCER, first sergeant, Company C, 3o8th Infantry; For extraordinary heroism in action near Stonne, France, November 6, 1918. Voluntarily leading a patrol for a flank attack on the town of Stonne, through unusual artillery fire and exacting machine-gun fire, Sergt. Mercer, leaving his patrol, went forward alone to draw fire from the nests in order to divert the enemy's attention from the attacking patrol.

HENRY MILLER, private, Company E, 3o8th Infantry. I For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, October 3, 1918. When his company had been cut off from communication and exposed to intense shell and machine-gun fire, Private Miller observed and attacked an enemy sniper, silencing further fire from that source. While attempting to return he was killed by machine-gun fire.

FORNEY B. MINTZ, sergeant, Company A, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, September 28, 1918. Sergt. Mintz in command of a platoon, worked his way through the enemy rear guard and captured five machine guns and an ammunition-carrying party. Although badly wounded when an organized position of the enemy was encountered, he made his way back to request reinforcements and brought with him two German prisoners, from whom valuable information was obtained.

JOHN J. MONSON, private, Company A, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, September 29, z918. In order to obtain ammunition and rations, Private Monson, with another soldier, accompanied an officer in an effort to reestablish communication between battalion and regimental headquarters. They were attacked by a small party of Germans, but drove them off, killing one. When night came, they crawled unknowingly into the center of a German camp, where they lay for three hours, undetected. Finally discovered, they made a dash to escape. In order to protect the officer, Private Monson deliberately drew the enemy fire to himself, allowing the officer to escape. Private Monson succeeded in getting through and delivering his message the next morning.

CARL MULRAIN (Army serial No. 1676239), private, Company D, 3o8th Infantry, 77th Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ville Savoye, France, August 23, 1918. While the 1st Battalion of his regi-ment was making an attack to regain ground from the enemy in the outpost zone along the Vesle River, Private Mulrain continued to advance when he discovered that three enemy machine guns occupied the high ground in front of him. With great courage and utter disregard for his own safety he continued to go forward in the face of concentrated enemy machine-gun fire, thus helping materially to force the enemy to evacuate his machine-gun emplacement, though himself killed by a machine-gun bullet. Next of kin: Miss Maude Lawrence, aunt, A Street, New Village, Whitinsville, Mass. Residence at enlistment: Main Street, Uxbridge, Mass.

JAMES F. NASH, private, Company K, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ville Savoye, France, August 22, 1917. While his company was attacked by greatly superior numbers of the enemy, Private Nash continued to operate his automatic rifle, even after having been wounded three times in the chest. After the attacking force had been driven off, he refused the use of a litter in favor of a comrade whom he thought more seriously wounded than himself.

ARTHUR NORWAT, sergeant, Company M, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Revillon, France, September 14-15, 1918. On September 14 he advanced ahead of his company and with an automatic rifle single handed silenced an enemy machine-gun nest, capturing the gunner. On the following day, after having assumed command because of the fact that all officers had become casualties, he assembled 13 men and led them in a charge against superior forces of the enemy, recapturing a trench which shortly before had been taken by the enemy.

HOLGAR PETERSON (Army serial No. 1709 115), corporal, Company G, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Charlevaux, France, October 3-7, 1918. While leading a scouting party, Corpl. Peterson encountered an enemy patrol and displayed exceptional courage and leadership in killing the officer and two soldiers who composed it. He repeatedly volunteered for dangerous patrol work with great bravery and aggressiveness until he was killed. Home address: Mrs. Catherine Peterson (wife), 26 West Thirty-eighth Street, New York, N. Y.

FRANK POLLINGER, private, Company G, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Charlevaux, France, October 3-7, 19 18. During the period of four days, when his battalion was surrounded by the enemy and after his squad leader had been wounded, Pvt. Pollinger took command of the squad, although he himself was suffering from a wound received four days previous. His indomitable courage and perseverance upheld the spirit and morale of his men under such trying circumstances and he continued to direct their movements until forced out of action by a second wound.

JOSEPH J. POWERS, sergeant, Company E, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near St. Juvin, France, October 15, 1918-After four men had been killed or wounded, while attempting to deliver a message from the company commander to the rear, Sergt. Powers volunteered and carried the message through area swept by machine-gun fire with no regard for his personal safety.

JOSIAH ALVIN POWLESS, first lieutenant, Medical Detachment, 3o8th Infantry, 77th Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Chevieres, France, October 14, 1918. When notified that his colleague, Capt. James M. McKibben, had been wounded, Lieut. Powless immediately went forward to his assistance. He crossed an area subjected to intense machine-gun and constant Artillery fire, reached his colleague, whose wound proved to be fatal, and after dressing his wounds had him carried to the rear. Lieut. Powless was seriously wounded while performing this service. Nearest relative; Mrs. Josiah A. Powless, wife, Route No. 2, West DePere, Wis. Residence at appointment: Route No. 2, West DePere, Wis.

CHARLES P. RILEY, sergeant, Company I, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Grand Pr6, France, October 14-, 1918. When his company was halted by machine-gun fire which threatened to wipe out his entire number, Sergt. Riley led a patrol and charged the nest, and was successful not only in cleaning out the stronghold but in enabling his company to command a more favorable position.

ARTHUR HARRISON ROBINSON, first lieutenant, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ville Savoye, France, August 22, 1918. Under a screen of dense fog and the smoke of a heavy barrage, the Germans set up a machine gun within 30 yards of the flank of Lieut. Robinson's company. The Germans opened up a deadly fire as the fog lifted, but Lieut. Robinson attacked the position with grenades and drove off the enemy. He then turned the gun on the advancing Germans, completely breaking up their counterattack.

PATRICK ROCHFORD, private, Company L, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action west of St. Juvin, France, October 16, 19
Pvt. Rochford, with another soldier, volunteered to cross a level open space for 6oo yards swept by converging machine-gun fire to deliver a message to the front line, undeterred by the knowledge that six other soldiers had been wounded in a similar attempt. Crawling from one shell hole to another, he succeeded in reaching the front line and delivering the message.

HARRY ROGERS, second lieutenant, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, October 2-6, 1918. He was in command of a detachment comprising part of two battalions which were cut off and surrounded by the enemy in the Argonne Forest, France. During the days of the isolation from friendly troops, he was on the exposed flank without food. Although under a heavy concentration of fire from enemy machine guns and snipers, by his personal example of calmness he kept his men in order and helped repel counterattacks. This intrepid officer was killed in action October 6, 1918.

HAAKON ROSSUM, corporal, Company G, 308th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Charlevaux, France, October 3-7 , ~9~8.

During the five days that his battalion was cut off and surrounded by the enemy and throughout these five days of hunger, suffering, and enemy attacks Corpl. Rossum, commanded an advanced outpost in a position exposed to each hostile onslaught. He was subjected constantly to fire from snipers, machine guns, trench mortars, and hand grenades. By his high courage, personal example, and inspiring leadership he defeated all attempts of the enemy to force his post back, and by so doing aided materially in the defense of his section of the line.

JOSEPH SAUER, corporal, Company F, 3o8th Infantry. For extra-ordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, October 2, 1918. He volunteered in the face of heavy enemy machine-gun fire to deliver a message to a platoon sergeant who was leading an attack on enemy machine-gun nests. He was wounded in one leg just as he started and was wounded in the other leg before reaching the sergeant, but did, by calling aloud, deliver the message verbally and accurately.

GORDON L. SCHENCK, second lieutenant, Company C, 3o8th Infantry, 77th Division. For extraordinary heroism in action in the Argonne Forest, near Binarville, France, October 3 to 7, 1918. While his battalion was surrounded by the enemy, Lieut. Schenck, by his heroic conduct, while repulsing frequent enemy attacks, inspired his command. Fearlessly exposing himself to fire, he seized his rifle and ran to the top of a bank in front of his company's position where he was able to throw hand grenades at the enemy, until killed by an enemy shell. Emergency address: Mrs. Charles N. Schenck, mother, 113 Cambridge Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. Address at appointment: 37 Wall Street, New York, N. Y.

RICHARD B. SHERIDAN, first lieutenant, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ville Savoye, France, August 23, 1918. While leading his platoon in attack Lieut. Sheridan had one of his legs badly shattered by shell fire. Refusing evacuation he remained to direct the movements of his men until he died.

IRVING SIROTA, private, first class, Medical Department, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France,, October 2-7, 1918. He was on duty with a detachment of his regiment which was cut off and surrounded by the enemy in the forest of Argonne. During this period he was without food but he continued to assist and give first aid to the wounded, exposing himself to heavy shell and machine-gun fire at the risk of his life, until he was completely exhausted.

SIDNEY SMITH, private, Company H, 3o8th Infantry. For extra-ordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, October 2-8, 1918. When his company had been cut off from communication he, though seriously wounded, refused to seek shelter. He participated in several attacks with courage and aggressiveness, using his rifle very effectively and encouraging his comrades. When relief came he walked back to the dressing station, so that medical attention could first be given to the more seriously wounded.

WILLIAM 0. SULLIVAN, first lieutenant, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Chevieres, France, October 14, 1918. After his company commander had been seriously wounded and he himself wounded in the head by a machine-gun bullet, Lieut. Sullivan continued to lead and encourage his men until wounded the second time. He then continued in command of the company until ordered to be evacuated by his battalion commander.

ALBERT E. SUMMERS (Army serial No. 1679686), private, Company H, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action in the Argonne Forest, France, October 6, 1918. In the face of direct machine-gun fire be left cover and went out 100 yards to rescue a wounded soldier. Dragging the wounded man back to his funk hole, he gave him first aid, and then again exposing himself to enemy fire obtained water for him. He showed utter disregard for personal danger in aiding other wounded men in addition to performing his duties as scout. Home address: James Summers, father, Bristol, Bedminster, England.

WLADYSLAW TABARA (serial No. 1710369), private, Company M, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Rievillon, France, September 13, 1918. With a companion he determined the location of a machine gun which had checked the advance of his company, and, advancing ahead of the company, made a sudden rush from the flank, killed, wounded, or captured the entire crew, and captured four machine guns.

JAMES TAPPEN, private, first class, Company D, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, September 28, 1918. He pushed forward alone against several enemy snipers who were causing many casualties among his comrades. He killed two of snipers, but was killed while attempting to capture the third sniper.

BENJAMIN E. TRERISE (Army serial No. 17o8988), first sergeant, Company F, 3o8th Infantry, 78th Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, October 4, 1918, and near St. Juvin, October 15, 1918. During an attack in the Argonne Forest, October 4, 1918, Sergt. Trerise was wounded in five places by shrapnel. Although in need of medical attention, he refused to be evacuated but remained, steadying his men and holding his unit intact. On October 15, after two attempts at rescue of a wounded man had failed, he advanced through heavy enemy fire and brought the wounded man to shelter. Residence at enlistment: 108 West Eighty-fourth Street, New York, N. Y.

CHARLES W. TURNER, first lieutenant, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, October 6, 1918.

Surrounded by enemy machine guns and snipers and under heavy shell fire, he refused to surrender, but held his position with extraordinary heroism and total disregard for his own life until he and all his detachment were killed.

JOSEPH USAC, private, first class, Company A, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, September 27, 1918. Returning to the line, after being wounded by a hand grenade the previous day, Pvt. Usac persistently requested to be allowed to assist stretcher bearers in the removal of the wounded. While performing this heroic mission, constantly subjected to treacherous machine-gun and artillery fire, he was again wounded.

EDWIN T. VAN DUZER, private, first class, Company K, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ville Savoye, France, August 22, 1918. He was a member of a combat liaison group which was attacked by liquid fire. Although severely burned, he alone charged the flame thrower and put him out of action, after which he reassembled his men and continued on duty until relieved.

JOSEPH VEDILAGO, corporal, Company A, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism ia action near Binarville, France, September 28, 1918. He crawled from his shelter to get an automatic rifle after the members of the rifle team had been killed or wounded, and with this weapon continued in the advance until he was killed by shell fragments.

FRANCIS W. WAGNER, JR., sergeant, Company C, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Badonviller, France, June 24, 1918. He was found badly wounded in the neck and legs, crawling back to bring up support to his position.

CHARLES W. WHITING, private, Headquarters Company, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Barbonval, France, September 10, 1918. He had charge of maintaining a telephone line from Barbonval to Blanzy. The line was under direct observation of the enemy, and the appearance of a lineman was the immediate occasion for shelling by the enemy with field artillery and 1-pounders. He stuck to his work repairing break after break until he was mortally wounded by the enemy shell fire.

CLINTON L. WHITING, first lieutenant, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near La Harazee, France, September 26-28, 1918- During the advance in the Argonne Forest Lieut. Whiling exposed himself fearlessly to enemy machine-gun and sniper fire while leading his men and consolidating his position, which was in a marsh covered with wire grass and stunted brush. He continued to lead his men with utter disregard for personal danger until he fell seriously wounded by a machine-gun bullet on the afternoon of September 28 near Binarville. Home address: D. Clinton Whiting (father), 21 Fulton Street, New York, N. Y.

MEREDITH WOOD, first lieutenant, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Badonviller, France, June 30, and near Chery-Chartreuve, France, August 24, 1918. On the first date, accompanied by only one noncommissioned officer, Lieut. Wood, acting as signal officer, penetrated the enemy's front line, and bravely patroled their territory, following a wire which was thought to lead to a listening post. He cut the wire and returned to our lines with valuable information. On August 24, when a direct hit was made on the building occupied by regi-mental headquarters, he was severely gassed when he removed his mask to aid a mortally wounded soldier and to search for others who might have been overcome.

IRVING WOOLF, private, Company I, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Revillon, France, September 10, 1918. Volunteering to serve on a patrol for the purpose of capturing prisoners, Pvt. Woolf crawled forward to a sentry Post 25 yards from the enemy lines. Overpowering two sentries, he started back under a heavy barrage of rifle grenades and rifle fire, and ignoring his great danger, he successfully delivered his prisoners to the battalion commander.

ERNEST WORNEK (Army serial No. 3137861), private, first class, Company G, 3o8th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Moulin de Charlevaux, France, October 3, 1918. Facing heavy machine-gun and rifle fire, he went out alone and rescued a soldier who had been wounded in advance of our lines while on a patrol. Home address: Mrs. E. B. Baker, mother, Mackey, Idaho.
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