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March 11, 1918

1
New York’s Own Give a Cordial Hand to Distinguished Citizen Of Old York

 

            British Primate Tells Soldiers They Are Pioneers of Army to Whom Will Be Given the Part of Deciding Final War Issue.

            New York’s most gallant sons extended a welcome to Old Yorke’s first citizen this past week, when His Grace the most Rev. Cosmo Gordon Lang, Archbishop of York and Primate of England, visited the Metropolitan Division, reviewing troops and addressing men and officers.  The distinguished visitor enthused over the 77th and expressed great gratification at the splendid physical condition of soldiers here, their fine intelligence and the surprising degree of training reached.  He complimented Gen. Johnson, and was encouraged seeing the stalwart section of the American Army soon to take its place beside the men of England and the other Allied nations.  he spoke of the heart of the allies and besought America to send its armies speedily for the salvation of the world.

            The Primate was brought here by acting Chaplain William T. Manning of the 302d Engineers and was entertained by Gen. Johnson.  He spent the night in camp and in the morning reviewed the 305th Infantry, Col. Smedberg’s “peppy 305th” and was taken for an inspection of the camp two addresses were made in the Y.M.C.A. Auditorium.  One to the officer of the division. Heard by practically all the officers from Brigadier Generals to second Lieutenants; the other to enlisted men, who packed the Auditorium.  He said he was speaking to the army for which is reserved a decisive place in the war.  Part of his address follows:

 

New Man Power Needed

 

            I want to emphasize the tremendous urgency of your bringing all that you can to the service of the Allies at the present moment, It is not too much to say that on the incoming of your thoroughly trained and efficient increase of manpower the foundations of civilization for many years depend.  Those of us who have gone through the strain for three and a half years realize this.  We can’t be the thought that with victory within our grasp it should be snatched from us after we have withstood for so long.

            That a peace loving people should have stood up for so long against odds so great is the reason we gave fir helping that our sacrifices have not been in vain. That we should have come so bear winning, and yet not have victory yet!  You know as well as I the pitiful Russian debacle! And the other powers that have threatened to undermine and destroy the peaceful developments of the nations of the world.

 

            Doubtful Issue Is Defeat

 

            It is not conceivable that we should stop now and have all these sacrifices in vain.  But unless we can have this country’s full manpower the issue must be left doubtful. And doubtful issue is as bad as defeat.  You men are the pioneers of America’s army and the steadfastness of your morale will vitally affect those coming after.  Remember not only for your own army but because of all that is best in civilization.  I am sure that this morale is being solidly and steadily laid here now.  I suppose there has never been a war when more depended upon the relationships between officers and men and the intelligence of the individual soldier, cheerful to bear hardships and strong in endurance.  Nothing is more important than fine confidence of men England and I think it is in the United States.  You have now an army which is not distinguishable from the great mass of the Nation. And that has been true of the armies fighting the allies cause, that they represented the citizenship of the Nation.

            I believe never in the history of your country has such a mass citizenship been brought under discipline.  This army represents different types of education, different creeds and different nationalities.  It is the great glory strength of your Republic that it can take the men of other nations, absorb them and weld them together with one great spirit.

 

            But the weakness of that has been the lack of a clear sense of comradeship among these various creeds, races and nationalities.  Now is the time to fill in that lack, under these conditions here, where you are training for one great cause of liberty, by making all men feel that they are bound together as brothers.

            A high responsibility is upon officers to set before their men a high morale example, as there is no relationship so open as that between officers and men.  Some of these young citizens will get their first justification for a low moral tone or their first vision of what an absolutely clean and honorable men can be.

            My heart is too full for oratory.  I see before my mind as i speak to you the graveyards by the Somme, where I stood beside the graves of men dearer than life to me.  I asked myself whether in the justice of God these men have died in vain.  As I look into your faces and feel the force of this Nation's latent power now being realized, I feel that there is hope.  When your great Nation came in, I felt that our dead have not died in vain--for liberty and civilization.

 

President's Daughter Sings for Soldiers

 

            Proves friend to Lads in O.D.--Upton Artists Appear.

 

            The Metropolitan Division entertained Miss Margaret Wilson, the president's daughter, last week, and was in turn entertained by her. Miss Wilson appeared here under the auspices of War Work Council Y.M.C.A. She is devoting considerable time to visiting the various camps and singing to the soldiers, and her trip to Upton was one of the first. She sang at the Y.M.C.A Auditorium and one of the huts, led the boyish song and proved herself an all around real friend to the lads in O.D. She stayed at the Y.W.C.A. Hostess House, Fourth Avenue and 15th street, and was entertained at dinner by Gen. Johnson. In her party Melville Clark, harpist, and Mrs. Ross David. Soldier talent figured also on the program. Sergt. Major Frank Bibb, 104th F.A., pianist, who has appeared with Oscar Siegel, accompanied Serge. Hochstein, violinist; Mario Rudolph and Laeff Rossnoff, cellist.

Censorship to Be Clamped On Pay Shows

 

Division Entertainment Director to Promote Various Activities.

 

            All pay performances in camp henceforth must have programmed submitted to a censorship at Division Headquarters, according to a recent bulletin issued from the office of the Commanding General. The order was the culmination of criticism heaped upon a number of entertainments for which admission was charged and which failed to give the value of their money to the many men who attended, according to both men and officers. Lieut. M. S. Revnes, who has been given charges of division entertainment matters, will vise the programs of entertainment and will see to it that the men who are solicited for tickets to this performance are safeguarded. The announcement creates widespread satisfaction in camp, as it is now assured that all entertainments will have as high grade character as the advertisements of them proclaim.          

            Lieut. Revnes will also promote division entertainments both here and when the division gets overseas. A mammoth minstrel show with several hundred men “in the circle” is one of the first enterprises to be started, and rehearsals will begin for an early performance at the Liberty Theatre. Numerous other entertainment projects are being considered by the division authorities.

 2

Brother Writes Advice for the Trip Over

            A letter received by a private on this side from a brother who is “Over There” contains such practical matter that is it given herewith for the information and guidance of all concerned.

            Don't worry about any danger, as you will find every precaution taken.

            Regarding the food, you will miss the canteen very much, as you won't get any too much and can only get to the canteen on the boat by standing in line about four hours and missing mess &c. If you can get chocolate, bring it. Bring about 20 or 30 cakes, even though you have to carry them in your pack. You won't regret it, as you will need something to fill up on, and if you should you could get 20 cents for a 10 cent cake from any of the fellows.

            You won't get sick. We came on one of the very largest transports in use and it hardly rolled at all. The weather was warm and the sea smooth most of the way.

            You will probably wear your helmet most of the time.

            If you can get it, fill your canteen with lemon essence or lemonade, as the water tastes stale on board, and if you do feel sick it will taste good to you.

            Bring some salt, as you won't get any on board, and it will make the eats taste better.

            Try hard to secure an upper berth. There are three or four on top of one another, and if you can get one near a light, so you can lie in bed and read, it is worth buying from another man. I could have sold mine for $6.

            Get a good salt water soap for washing, as nothing else is any good.

            For shaving you can probably get enough fresh water, otherwise you are liable to grow a beard. Bring all the tobacco you can carry, and a deck of cards.

            On the way over I studied French, and it is a good thing to do. If you don't do that bring enough reading matter to last you the trip, as it is scarce on board.

            Don't expect to enjoy the trip like you did your previous voyage. It is like joining the army-rough at first, but gradually you get used to it.

 

New York’s Own Give a Cordial Hand to Distinguished Citizen Of Old York

 

            British Primate Tells Soldiers They Are Pioneers of Army to Whom Will Be Given the Part of Deciding Final War Issue.

 

            New York’s most gallant sons extended a welcome to Old Yorke’s first citizen this past week, when His Grace the most Rev. Cosmo Gordon Lang, Archbishop of York and Primate of England, visited the Metropolitan Division, reviewing troops and addressing men and officers.  The distinguished visitor enthused over the 77th and expressed great gratification at the splendid physical condition of soldiers here, their fine intelligence and the surprising degree of training reached.  He complimented Gen. Johnson, and was encouraged seeing the stalwart section of the American Army soon to take its place beside the men of England and the other Allied nations.  He spoke of the heart of the allies and besought America to send its armies speedily for the salvation of the world.

 

            The Primate was brought here by acting Chaplain William T. Manning of the 302d Engineers and was entertained by Gen. Johnson.  He spent the night in camp and in the morning reviewed the 305th Infantry, Col. Smedberg’s “peppy 305th” and was taken for an inspection of the camp two addresses were made in the Y.M.C.A. Auditorium.  One to the officer of the division. Heard by practically all the officers from Brigadier Generals to second Lieutenants; the other to enlisted men, who packed the Auditorium.  He said he was speaking to the army for which is reserved a decisive place in the war.  Part of his address follows:

 

New Man Power Needed

            I want to emphasize the tremendous urgency of your bringing all that you can to the service of the Allies at the present moment, It is not too much to say that on the incoming of your thoroughly trained and efficient increase of manpower the foundations of civilization for many years depend.  Those of us who have gone through the strain for three and a half years realize this.  We can't be the thought that with victory within our grasp it should be snatched from us after we have withstood for so long.

            That a peace loving people should have stood up for so long against odds so great is the reason we gave for helping that our sacrifices have not been in vain. That we should have come so bear winning, and yet not have victory yet!  You know as well as I the pitiful Russian debacle! And the other powers that have threatened to undermine and destroy the peaceful developments of the nations of the world.

 

            Doubtful Issue Is Defeat

            It is not conceivable that we should stop now and have all these sacrifices in vain.  But unless we can have this country’s full manpower the issue must be left doubtful. And doubtful issue is as bad as defeat.  You men are the pioneers of America’s army and the steadfastness of your morale will vitally affect those coming after.  Remember not only for your own army but because of all that is best in civilization.  I am sure that this morale is being solidly and steadily laid here now.  I suppose there has never been a war when more depended upon the relationships between officers and men and the intelligence of the individual soldier, cheerful to bear hardships and strong in endurance.  Nothing is more important than fine confidence of men England and I think it is in the United States.  You have now an army which is not distinguishable from the great mass of the Nation. And that has been true of the armies fighting the allies cause, that they represented the citizenship of the Nation.

            I believe never in the history of your country has such a mass citizenship been brought under discipline.  This army represents different types of education, different creeds and different nationalities.  It is the great glory strength of your Republic that it can take the men of other nations, absorb them and weld them together with one great spirit.

            But the weakness of that has been the lack of a clear sense of comradeship among these various creeds, races and nationalities.  Now is the time to fill in that lack, under these conditions here, where you are training for one great cause of liberty, by making all men feel that they are bound together as brothers.

            A high responsibility is upon officers to set before their men a high morale example, as there is no relationship so open as that between officers and men.  Some of these young citizens will get their first justification for a low moral tone or their first vision of what an absolutely clean and honorable men can be.

            My heart is too full for oratory.  I see before my mind as i speak to you the graveyards by the Somme, where I stood beside the graves of men dearer than life to me.  I asked myself whether in the justice of God these men have died in vain.  As I look into your faces and feel the force of this Nation's latent power now being realized, I feel that there is hope.  When your great Nation came in, I felt that our dead have not died in vain--for liberty and civilization.

 

Y Goes to New Men in their Barracks

            When men are unable to come to the Y.M.C.A. according to the precepts of the Red Triangle organization, “Go to them.” And that is what secretaries of the green huts have been doing latterly to help make it pleasanter for the casuals who have been under the usual precautionary quarantine. Friendly visits with stationery and stamps have been made to the many from up-state and far from home. ON Sunday eighty-four religious meetings were held in fifty-six barracks, with a total attendance of 5,000 soldiers. Jews and Gentiles alike united in these interesting meetings reported by the men as very helpful. They were led by the Y.M.C.A. secretaries and chaplains.

 

302D F.S. Battalion Active

            The 302d Field Signal Battalions basketball team won its second game from the Camp Utilities, Q.M.C., at the 14th street and Second Avenue Y.M.C.A. Hut, and the Wigwaggers now wait to see whether they play the M.T. Company or the 321st F.S.B., each one of these teams having won one game, which they hope to okay off soon, The upper “J” section hopes to have its representative team meet the Base Hospital, the 152d Depot Brigade and the 367th Regiment in the mean future. All are anticipating a bug struggle for supremacy.

A Pro-German Wind Removes Roof at Base Hospital and New Cure for Rheumatism Is Discovered

Boys at Base Have Blowout, but They Enjoyed It Hugely-Anything for Diversion-Other Doins on the Big Isle of Ills and Pills

Being a patient in Ward B-9 at the Base Hospital is exciting sometimes, and even having rheumatism is a pleasure when you can have the experience of the rood blowing off. Part of it did last week, on the day a gale blow so fiercely that even Private Alexander, who might be called Alexander the Great with respect to his physical proportions, had to lean up against the weather to keep a sober balance. Such a big wind has not been felt at Camp Upton within the memory of the oldest inhabitant.

Ward master Stanton had joust distributed the noon meal and the show was going big. Suddenly-loud crash, the ward building swayed as though it had done adrift from its moorings and down the length of road where the ventilating covering had been there was naught but sky. “Germans,” shouted everyone. The guy who manages the wind concession, it is believed here, is pro-Teut. B-9 a few minutes previous had been confined to their beds with rheumatism. But just at that moment nothing confined them. They were on the floor before the rooftop landed, regardless of the gust that seen from any passing hostile airplane they were in full public view. They were scarcely attired for this or for the hurricane that came through the opening above but somehow they felt more comfortable that way.

Ward master Stanton got them back into bed with assurances that everyone was saved and the German attack had been repulsed on all other fronts. Then he went outside to look for his wandering roof op. He found the entire covering of the ventilating slot intact a few feet away from the ward, safely deposited out of harm’s way. A detail of carpenters soon had it nailed on tight. Now every night the patients look up before going to bed to make sure the roof is still sticking around. “Zeppelin Neck” is replacing rheumatics as a popular malady.

A week ago the Darktown Follies of 1918 came to the hospital. Though these entertainers from the 367th Infantry were all of a somber tint, they brought no gloom. Among other things, they helped convalescence with & jazz band, which included a drummer who needs only two sticks a tin pan and a whistle.

The 267ths own Jawn MacCormack sang “For you A Rose” so appealingly there was hardly a dry eye when he finished. Sergt. Randall sand, broke all sprinting records in a jig and then explained how he’d been bawled out at inspection for being out of line. When it was really the shoes of the private in the rank behind him that protruded. Sergt. Battle has a tussle with the piano and came out on top. A quartet from Company K did its duty, winding up by giving the regimental song an airing.

In the second game of the inter barracks basketball series a composite team made up of J-6 and j-7 spoiled the ambitions of J-1, 12 to 8. A picked team from the hospital defeated a quintet from the Veterinary Hospital by 34 to 3, and as several requests have been made to learn the line-up of the teams, they follow: Veterinary Hospital-Smith, Kearns, Edgar, Stanz, Weirner; Base Hospital-Kornbluh, Carroll, Hamje, Mahoney, Sappit,

 3

A Quick Night

A trainload of newly drafted men reached their cantonment late in the afternoon. By the time they had passed through the receiving station and the hands of the Doctors it was nearly midnight. Several of them were awakened at four o'clock the following morning to assist the cooks in preparing breakfast. As one well built, sleepy drafted man got to his feet, he stretched and yawned:

"It doesn't take long to spend a night in the army."-Everybody's Magazine.

 

Americans Still Have Hard Row to Hoe to Beat Germans, Says Veteran Who Left Leg in Trenches

            "Don’t go over to France thinking that all you have to do is to walk into Germany. The war is a long way from being over yet."

This warning is brought back k to America soldiers and to the American people in general by Rufus Reynolds, of Gloucester, Massachusetts, who went to France with the Canadian forces February 12, 1914. Three times he went over the top and came back unharmed. In his fourth great battle he was so severely wounded that his right leg had to be amputated. The fourteen hours that he lay on the field wounded and looked on at the fighting turned his hair white and made him resolve to "come back and wake up the American people to the fact that this is not little toy war." as he puts it.

"We make a big mistake over here I. Thinking that the war may be over almost any time." Said Reynolds. "If we put ten million men instantly upon the battlefield, we could drive the Germans back, but we would sacrifice eight million men in doing it. It’s all right for our boys to go over in good spirits. But they want to get it out to knock the Germans out in two or three weeks, because the Huns are a long way from being beaten yet. The only way we can hope to win this war is to sit still and hold tight, and wear them out."

Two years, at the very least, will be needed to end the war, in Reynolds opinion, and there can be no uncertainty about the outcome. America and her allies are bound to with.

"That first winter of the war, 150,000 of us held the lines against 4,000,000 Germans." He said. "It stands to reason that if Germany couldn't break through our lines then, she can't do it now. But she’s still a long way from being on her last legs. The United States must stand the brunt of the war now, both in men and in money. France and in England are pretty nearly spent. It's up to us."

 

Cantonment Types

This is to praise of the Regular Army Non-Com. And his glories.

"Full of strange oaths and bearded like pard." Wrote Will Shakespeare. Probably with the R.A.N.C. in mind. The strange oaths are wholesomely meant. No gingerbread, tripping niceties of speech escape him. His language is his own. He isn't bearded any more, but that is an insignificant matter.

The Regular Army Non-Com. Has a speech characteristic of his manner of doing everything. He is direct, blunt, smacking not a whit of molly coddieism. He is apt to be stocky in shape and close knit of body. Ability to take a man's part in a rough and tumble is plainly his.

As he has no frills of speech, so is foppery in dress foreign to him. His plainness is a matter of pride. He prefers old clothes to new, clothes with the stamp of service on the good but not gaudy.

Frankness, dependability, simplicity-a trio of graces! And who doesn't admire them and agree on their Americanism. The Regular Army Non-Com carries the imagination to Western plains. Fort parade grounds and peace-time recruiting stations. In himself, he is an American Barrack Room Ballad.

He is a democrat, a man for whom fairness has become a protective coloring. His sense of injustice is uncanny. And yet, he has respect-for discipline and all it implies. He has it without taint of servility. Confidence and mutual repose of trust exist between him and his officers of superior rank. The no -com. knows his job-how far it goes. He keeps within limits recognized as traditional and right. He is jealous for recognition of his province, and deserves it on his merits, sterling and abiding.

Civil Court's Jurisdiction

            According to an opinion by the Judge Advocate General of the Army, "The civil authorities do not have the legal right to hold in arrest for misdemeanors persons in the military service, and it is their duty, upon request, to surrender such persons, without trial, to the military authorities. The Government is entitled to the services of its soldiers and local courts should not be permitted to deprive the Government of such services."

 

G Reports On Some More Celebrities

Capt. Jack Goes on Honeymoon Furlough out to Beacon City

            Having the honor of being the youngest soldier at camp. Sergt. Michael Nauman, only eighteen years old, enlisted when he was seventeen. The Sergeant is a pupil in the bayonet school and the way he handles the rifle at bayonet drill is wonderful. He is now instructing the men of Company G. In a short time he will have every man in the company and expert bayonet men.

            Corpl. Jack O’Donnell, who halls from Beacon City, has just returned from the furlough. The boys are all congratulating him and asking him how he enjoyed his honeymoon. Jack just smiles and walks away.  Corpl. O’Donnell’s act was frustrated last September when he was called to the colors. He had planned to get married, had the best man and minister. The knot was about to be tied when he received his notice to report to camp. He wrote at least two letters a day to his fiancée. But as he believes the time is drawing near for his departure he decided to get married immediately.

Harry Grossman, Alias Brown, Puts on Show

            Recently at the Fifth and Eighty seats were at premium, for the notice that Henry Grossman, 307th infirmary, was staging the show insured it's worthwhile. Henry is well known in the vaudeville stage as Henry Brown, and his feet are still able to shift pretty fast when his coon dance gets going.

            The bill opened with a William S. Hart picture, “The Silent Man.” With Al Lurch of the 398th Machine Gun Company at the piano. Joe Wolfe of the 307th Medical Corps did some twisting in a contortionist act, and Harry Abrahams Headquarters Company, 306th Infantry, followed. Other numbers on the program were the well-known Upton Four-Solomon. Reedy, Baker and Mauvey; Henry Brown's dancing act and Henry Hepner of Company E, 307th Infantry a life of drum corps singer.

Hebrew Headquarters To Be Opened Soon- Co-Operation Story

New Men Write Letters with Paper and Envelopes Symbolizing Brotherhood.

            The Jewish Welfare Board Building, Acker Merrell & Condit, is completed, and will be ready for occupancy as sons as the furniture and furnishings arrive. The building is to be used as a headquarters for the Jewish Board of Welfare Work in Camp Upton, and from it all activates of a Jewish nature will originate.

            There will be a dormitory for the men of the Training School for Welfare Workers, and smaller rooms for the permanent staff in the camp and visiting rabbis, who come to the camp for services. Besides this there will be a large social room and a few other comfortable rooms.

Through the Jewish Board for Welfare Work at Camp Upton the B’nal British Lodge of Patchogue is holding dances at Moose Hall in Patchogue every Saturday evening. There are only a limited number of tickets, so come early. Tickets of admittance can be obtained at the office of the Jewish Board for Welfare Workers on Friday evening or on Saturday morning before 11 o’clock. Everyone is welcome.

Government to Give Matsoths

            The Jewish Welfare Board has been officially informed that the United States Government will furnish matsoths to all Jewish man in uniform, both here and abroad, for the coming festival of Passover.

            The J.W.B. will soon begin holding services at Church Headquarters, Upton Boulevard. Until further notice however services as usual: Orthodox Y hut, 5th and 8th 7 P.M.: Conservative Reform, Y Hut 2d and 14th 635; Saturday’s, orthodox services are held in the 2d and 7th y Hut at 10 A.M. Friday, March 15,Rabbi Oak Chertoff will speak at the orthodox services Rabbi Maurice Harris at the Conservative Reform.

Speaking of Co-Operation

            The Jewish community of Patchogue has been most hospitable to the Camp Upton boy’s affairs being planned for every Saturday evening. Invitations available at office of J.W.B. Recently forty soldiers were royally entertained in the club rooms of the Patchogue Hebrew Alliance. Dancing, refreshments and pool figured in the evening. Some of the lads were entertained overnight.

            Speaking of co-operation K. of C., J.W.B. and Y, .M.C.A. are hardly distinguishable at times. Hotel accommodations recently couldn’t be secured for a visiting rabbi, and it was the K. of C. that stepped up with a cordial invitation. The rabbi was enthusiastic over the hospitality of the Neighbor Knights. And this week the Y secretaries at Fifth Avenue and First Street arranged to so dome barrack visiting among new men. The new men were given a wonderful example of how all organizations work together what the inner circle signifies and what the Y.M.C.A and J.W.B. stand for. Mr. Harmond of the Y ran out of stationary during the trip around, and Mr Rosenthal of the J.W.B. exhausted his envelope supply, so the supply was pooled and the new fellows sent letters back home with envelope, bearing the red triangle and paper the Star of David. One Jewish lad, using a Y envelope for the first time wrote under the red triangle “Jewish Branch.”

            The welfare Board has several thousand Hebrew army prayer books. That may be secured at the temporary J.W.B. headquarters, Fifth Avenue and Eight Street. All men are urged to call at once and secure a copy.

 4

Linguist Would Help

            A unique and valuable service is offered non-English speaking men here by Miss Vacek, a native Bohemian who is located at the Y.W.C.A. Hostess house  3d Avenue and 6th Street. Miss Vacek speaks Ruthenian (Ukranian), Polish, Slovak, Russian and Bohemian and is anxious to help any men writing letters for them or aiding in any other way. She is at the Y.W. during most of the day, but more especially in the evening.

 

New Men Catch Spirit Existing Between Men and Officers of 77th

            The Archbishop of York, speaking here, stated one of the most important requisites for a victorious army was a sympathetic relationship between officers and men of the Metropolitan Division have established that understanding to a remarkable degree. It is interesting to see that the new men, just arrived, have caught the spirit too. The following letter to Trench and Camp indicates that they have:

            “We, the undersigned, send a word to you regarding the 305th Field Artillery (Battery D). We casuals in that battery are from local boards E, 19 and 20 from the Bronx, and we have had the pleasure and good fortunes to be commanded by Lieuts. Pike, Shutt and Littlefield. We can-not find language to express our appreciation of the way the officers and men have treated us. We hope in due time, by strenuous study and work, to merit the kindness shown. (Signed) The Committee-Private Max Greenwald, John W. King, James V. Coffin and George Werner.”

 

No Riots Here Election Day

Passes with Minimum of Excitement-Twelve Votes in Whole Place

            No one was killed in the Election Day riots at Camp Upton. In fact, there were no riots. And further, in fact, very few knew it was Election Day. So there you were. Very few Exchanges, A. M. and C., or any of the other well-known Boulevard resorts, to celebrate the returns. As far as could be ascertained, found out or known, they weren’t any returns. Oh, yes, one fellow was discovered gloating over his comrades for having voted when they hadn’t, but he was suspected of having been the victim of shell shock or an overdose of Bevo, and wasn’t harmed.

            But There was, nevertheless, and Election Day at Upton recently-March 5, 1918 of a Tuesday-to be exact. It was a special election to fill vacancies in the seventh, Eighth, Twenty-first and Twenty-Second Congressional District in New York State. “Who Won?” was asked by one soldier, but his comrades thought he was talking about the war and replied scathingly: “G’wan, y’boob, donchaknow it aint over yet!” The oft-quoted polls were established in three Y huts-Fifth Avenue and Eighth Street. Second Avenue and Seventh Street, and 19th street. At fifth and Eighth and twelve good men and true cast their ballots. The 307th a.d. 308th Infantry and 304th, 305th and 306th Machine gun Battalions are served by that hut. The vote elsewhere was also of this featherweight variety.

 

Obeyed Orders

The German soldier does exactly what he is told, and no more.

A German officer was drilling g recruits and had just given them the order: "Quick march!" When he noticed his sweetheart coming across the barrack square.

Forgetting all about the recruits, he entered into conversation with the girl and went away with her.

Six months later the same officer was walking down the main street of the same town when he saw some tattered and tired soldiers approaching him. One of the soldiers recognizing the officer, went up to him and, saluting, said: "Please sir, what about a halt?"

 

Our soul aim—victory

"Out there," I. The silence of the listening point, in the sentry go of the trenches, in the cold watchfulness of the front line-men hear voices that are lost in the clamor of noisy cities. What those voices tell you may not always be put I to language. But this one thing the hearers know-that deep answers unto deep, and certainty supplants doubt, and God himself comes very near. Why not, for is not this Gods war? Is America seeking any selfish advantage, or is her work taints with any sordid motive? Far from it. As a nation we. And stand before the bar neither Belgian factories nor French coal mines. When the war is over, we are coming home without one backward glance of envy at anything that Europe possesses. Russia’s seaports. Romania’s oil wells, the rich plains of Asia Minor, the art treasures of Italy incite no cupidity in out breasts. We are not drilling a nation and building a fleet to gain any prize of booty. Our taxpayers look to no spoils of victory to repay the costs of this war.

To the German mind we are quixotic simpletons, who deserve to lose, as we shall lose, in their opinion, our money and our sons. But there is one fact that the German mind has overlooked because it has been blinded by list of power and list of blood and gross atheism. The fact is the invincible appeal of man’s higher self. Germany will not see our aim and object until long after the Stats and Stripes have waved above the squatty crow that masquerades as the Prussian eagle. But this aim will become clear even to the German intellect some day and when Hun's see what the driving force was behind America. They will understand why it was impossible for is to lose.

The time may not come for Germany when even the channel ports of Belgium and the coal mines of the Briey basin will not seem worth the blood that they will cost and so Germany may decide to throw up the sponge. But no such time can come for America. Out prize is so high that to gain it is worth the last dollar and the last drop of blood-and to lose it is to lose everything else that makes life worth living. Germany's piratical purposes can be cooled in blood, but nothing h can satisfy the soul of America except to gain the end we sought when in April 1917, we entered the war. And what is that end? It is victory.

We are in the struggle for only one thing-to win. That means the utter crushing of Prussianism and with that the liberation, not only of Serbia, Romania, France, Belgium, but of the Germans as well. It means the restoration of the plunder and the reparation of the wrong perpetrated by the Hun's. It means the reestablishment of morality, the revival of religion, the habitation of man's soul and the retreat of wickedness. These are great ends. They cannot be computed by dollars or measured by provinces. Only one word embraces them all. That word is moving ideal of America today-Victory.

 

“Peppy 305th” Gives Friends Out-of-the-Ordinary Canvas Party

Showing your friends Camp Upton by star-shell light sounds like a trench dream or a no man’s land nightmare, but it is far from that and had been done by the 305th Infantry. They opened their big regimental tent recently. Friends of the regiment and kin and friends of the enlisted men and officers were brought from New York by the special train for the affair. The regimental band escorted them from the terminus of the widely known Long Island, and as they got to the spot where the railroad spur crossed First Avenue the darkness was banished by two great star shells, the same variety as they use “over there.” For thirty seconds or more they lit up the surrounding country as brightly as daylight, and the visitors got a picturesquely illumined view of the bayonet field-a regular trench touch. Red fire was set off, and the procession of the visitors was much in the nature of a triumphal parade with fanfare, hautboys, torches and the rest.

            The entire evening was olive drab in color and flavor. No importations were necessary. Col. Smedberg’s men put the entire evening of fun across with some things not so funny, such as gas mask drills, bayonet exhibitions and the rest. The bayonet drill was directed by Lieut. Burchell and the gas mask competition, for the shortest time to adjust masks, was directed by the 305ths gas expert, Lieut. Kenderine. There was some soldier boxing, a couple of fast bouts. The appearance of the Kohoma Kid, a regiment boxing favorite who has done his turn in the regular ring, was a feature. A soldiers chorus of the 100 voices furnished a good share of the entertainment, marching into the tent with full packs and going into their sketches as though after a bike business before  pleasure, Corpl. Davis. Company B, lead the chorus, and Sergt. Buunles acrobats were there.

            The affair was in the nature of a dedication of the regimental tent. The first one in Suffolk County as far as can be learned located below First Street. Chaplain Duncan Browne, who is ever active for the welfare of his boys was a leading spirit in the arrangements. Invitations were extended Gen. Johnson and other high division officers. The French and British Missions and others.

Replacement Camps Planned

            Replacement camps are to be established in at least two of the camps and cantonments at present occupied by the National Guard and the National Army troops. When the soldiers now in these camps and cantonments have been sent overseas, the Division of Operations of the general staff of the Army will select two or more of the sites for quarters for divisions of 50,000 men who will be held in readiness to fill vacancies in the Expeditionary Force. The replacement troops, which will be selected from men coming in from the draft, will re I've special training so as to fit them to fill vacancies abroad.

 

Report of English Class Work

Thousand Soldiers Taught to address letters-Soldier Vocabulary Imparted-Many Languages in the Classes.

Some indication has been given to h and Camp from time to time of the work being done in the Educational department of the Y.M.C.A. in teaching English to non-English speaking soldiers. The following report, issued by Sergt. Frank Mantiband, director of classes, tells a big story:

Over 1,000 soldiers were taught how to address letters, write letters, and were encouraged to keep in touch with the home folks.

Over 100 soldiers were taught to write their names, so that they could write their signature instead of putting down a cross.

The actual drills were taught in simple objective language and as a dyers were able in two month' time to take their place alongside of their American comrades and get along proficiently. The soldiers took up the manual of arms, the bayonet drills and the drills that presented especially difficult problems.

The leisure time of the soldiers was accounted for in class by interesting them in the recreational facilities of the camp.

Men who could not read or write in any language were taught successfully to speak intelligibly, to write the alphabet so that they could understand the semaphore, to sign their signature and to write and repeat the general orders.

The group system was used- the brighter men aiding their illiterates.

Phonics were emphasized, so that the foreigner was enabled to overcome his peculiar difficulties.

A military vocabulary was given to the soldiers.

The classes were used to relieve the strain of inactivity in the hospital and in Classes far from the "Y" huts.

General orders and soldierly qualities were drilled on.

Compositions on the cause of the war and of American history helped arouse patriotism in the soldiers.

Where commissioned officers taught the classes a friendly spirit was aroused between the teacher and the students.

The classes serve as an incentive to better work and note study on the part of the non-commissioned officers who took the instruction.

The soldiers were encouraged to read all the signs and bulletin boards; to speak English only, and to keep on practicing writing.

Military courtesy was emphasized in all the class work.

Among the nationalities in the schools are Italian, Polish, Russian, German, Swedish, Finnish, Hungarian, Chinese, Armenian, Syrian, Lithuanian, Greek, Servian, Slavish, Bohemian, Arabian, Turkish, French, Spanish, Czech, Dutch and Lettish.

In addition to these languages, Hebrew, Yiddish, Latin, and Japanese also have been spoken in the classes.

 

School for Chaplains

            A school for Army chaplains has been established at Fort Monroe to give them special training. At this school the appointees will receive instruction in military science, tactics and hygiene. At present there are about 570 chaplains in the army. General Pershing has recommended that a chaplain be appointed for every 1,200 officers and men. It is expected this recommendation will be adopted and that several thousand chaplains will be trained at the Fort Monroe School.

 

Shoot the Moon

Orderly Sergeant: Lights out, there.

Voice from the Hut: It’s the moon, sergeant.

Orderly Sergeant: I don't give a d-u what it is. Put it out, -Punch.

 

Stokes Trench Gun Beats German Mine-Throwers

            An artillery problem developed in France when opposite g armies settled down to warfare in the trenches, in some places oy a score of yards apart. The enemy was safe from shells from the big rifles which passed over and burst far to the rear, while it was difficult for the large-caliber howitzers to land a shot squarely in the ditch. A gun was needed which would gently lob a quantity of high explosive across the narrow space between the fighting lines.

The Germans set to work and produced their "minenwerfer," a small trench mortar, but the British responded with a superior article, the Stokes Gun, which has provided so effective that it ranked with the Mills and Hale grenades and the Lewis machine gun.

The stokes trench mortar is light enough to be carried by one man. The butt is set upon the group and a pair of legs, attached near the muzzle, make it possible to elevate the gun to the desired range.

Firing is simple. The gun is sighted and the shell dropped into its nuzzle. The rod explodes the carrying charge, and off sails the projectile on its errand of destruction in the enemy's trench, only a few hundred yards or less away.

 

Story of a Major

The following story is being told about a Brooklyn, N.Y., major now in camp.

"Soon after his promotion he was looking at the gold leaf on his shoulders somewhat quizzically. “You see it’s something like this." He explained. "Some years ago, when I was first a lieutenant, a friend d of mine asked me what were the functions of the various ranks and I told him that a first lieutenant is supposed to know everything and do nothing and a major is supposed to know nothing and do nothing."

"The friend heard about my promotion. And I received a telegram from him which read: 'You ought to make a fine major.'"

 

The Squealing Hun

            Beaten at their own game, the Germans are now appealing to the Geneva Red Cross to protest against the use of poison gases in battle.

The German army first introduced poison gases into warfare in April, 1915, when it made a surprise attack on the Franco-British troops in The Ypres. Use of gas as a weapons of warfare was specifically prohibited by solemn covenant signed by representatives of Germany held in contempt and prefers to disregard.

In the face of poison gas the French had to retire and the Canadians saves Ypres by desperate, costly fighting.

The British and French were compelled to fight fire with fire and their chemists were put to work devising means to give the Hun a dose of his own medicine. For many months the gases used by the British and French have been distinctively superior over the kinds used by the German and the gas masks devised by Americans and their allies practically completely nullify the effects of German gases. It was not until the Hun realized this superiority on the part of our Allies that he began to squeal.

The German's have various uses for the Red Cross. They employ its emblem as a target when they wish to sink hospital ships carrying sick and wounded soldiers and then attempt to use the humanitarian organization to bring about a discontinuance of firing gas shells which would not have been even thought of by our Allies but for the fact that defense against a barbarous enemy made it necessary.

Monsieur-Now Private-Andre Once Preached Pacifism-Wants to Fight

 

            Left France to Avoid Military Service, but Regrets It Now and Wishes He Had More Lives to Give America

 

            Private Andre Paul, late New York street haranguer, pacifist, socialist, dreamer aad French student, as a man with a massage., Nothing sets him apart from the new drafted men, the common privates in Capt. White-house's company F, 308th, but there is a past in his life which contains some interesting, significant things. He left Paris, his native city, when he was but twenty, a world peace visionary, a student full of misty hopes for lions lying down with lambs and little children leading them and all that sort of stuff. The reason he left Paris he does not emphasize much now, for hes been converted. But the sevrey is he left because he didn't believe in the military and wanted to evade compulsory military duty which France had just instituted. To American he came, and for years did nothing niy preach Socialism and peace, from street corners, on the beach, not at Waikiki, but Far Rockaway, and wherever else a soap box was handy. He believe that German Socialists would end the war. He taught French to Morris Hillquit. One of America's leading Socialists.

 

            But Now he's through with Socialism, with the American Bolsheviks, with pacifists-which the whole kit and caboodle of the gang that's ties weights to Uncle Sam's heels. The reasons: Private-Monsieur-Andre he's seen the perfidy, the ruthlessness, willfulness of Prussia, has seen that the world issue, and the only one, is Prussianism against liberty-and Private Andre is sorry he has only one life to give for America the country of his adoption. He says:

 

            “Long I was an ardent advocate of universal peace. I thought the German Socialists and Liberals would revolt against the most autocratic militaristic Government in the world. But Heine was right. Revolutions are impossible in Germany because they are forbidden. Since the people of Germany are too cowardly to rise they aid to the last man the unspeakable Prussian clique, there is but one course: To destroy completely, cost what it may, the Kaiser and his band of public malefactors. I am ashamed and very said that I did not understand before my duty as i do now. I shall; try to make up for lost time. I wish also I had more than one life to give. I take the oath as an American soldier to conduct myself in a worthy way privately or publicly and will try my best to show the German people the difference between a citizen and a subject.”

 

Athletically, 307th Is Vindicating Regiments Slogan, ‘Clear the Way’

 

            In Boxing and Basketball Faugh-a-Ballagh Boys Are Going Strong

 

Athletically, the 307th Infantry has found its range. Liet. Herbert A. Martin, athletic officer has taken a half hitch on the activities and his energies indicate that Col. Smiths boys will soon be in the first line trenched in boxing, basketball, baseball and anything else started. Battalion boxing finale were held recently, and the Hibernian trace in this outfit which carries a thorn stick and shouts Faugh-a-Ballagh was clearly discernible. There were some corking bouts. The winner.

 

First Battalion - Featherweight, COrpl. Heller, Co. B; lightweight, Corpl. Grennan, Co. A; welterweight, Private O’Connor, Co. A; Private Donkers, Co. B, won by forfeit in the middleweight class; light heavyweight, Shrank, Co. A, and the heavyweight honors went to private Foy, Co. D.

 

In the 2d Battalion the winners were: Featherweight, Harrigan, Headquarters Co.; lightweight, Duffel, M. G. Co: welterweight, Nicholson, M. G. Co.: By forfeit, middleweight, Newmier, M. G. Co.; light heavyweight, McCarron, Supply Co.: heavyweight, Sergt. Shambelin, M.G. Co.

 

Third Battalion - Featherweight, Hunt, Co. L; lightweight, Engelbrith, Co. M; welterweight, Fitzgerald, Co. L: middleweight, Tierney, Co. M; heavyweight, Swanson, Co. L.

 

Much interest was manifested in these bouts, as in every kind of sport that this regiment tackles. The rooters were there in full force and the cheering could be heard as far away as Eighth Street. The officials were: Referee. B.F. Bryant. Y. M. C. A.; Judges, Capt. Adams, Capt. Bladgen. Lieut. O’Brien and Benny Leonard: timekeepers. Lieuts. Perry and Wilde.

 

Basketball Championships

 

            Basketball has been seized upon by the 307th with the vigor that makes their slogan, “Clear the Way” private in the organization the spirit is firm to make a terrific fight for the division championship. Recently the regimental championship successfully engineered by Lieut. Martin was closed. Company I carried off the beautiful trophy-”307th Majors and Adjutants regimental basketball trophy” -presented by Majors Rich Gardiner and Jay and Capt. Spooner Adjutant. The winning quintet is: R. F., Asher: L. F., Adler; Centre, Grieves: R. G. Manson; L.G., Jason. Company G was defeated for the trophy. 33 to 21, in the Y. M. C. A. Auditorium. The game was battled from start to finish with every ounce of nerve and clean muscle the ten men could command. The officials: B. F. Bryant, Y. M. C. A., referee; umpire, R. V. Hayes; timers, Lieuts. Kenyon and Colbath: scorer, Lieut. Martin, athletic officer.

 

Teeth Not Pulled by Ex-Firemen in O.D., But Paddy’s done it

 

And Stable Where He Had His Office Hung Up “S.R.O.” Sign.

 

            It isn't every day that a successful bit of dentistry is performed by an ex-New York firemen wearing Uncle Sam's olive drab. But give Private Patrick J. Evans, Headquarters CO., 308th, credit. He's done it, and his “office” was stable, “Paddy” was once a member of Hook and Ladder Company 11, New York, and when he started out with his mates to do a job he got into the habit of doing it. That's why Private C. Patterson of that company, the “Irish Wop” of local vaudeville fame is showing a cavity in the forepart of his face. The tooth was of the “pivot” variety, and was on duty in the stables the other day. “Lead me to it.” Invited “Paddy.” Patterson was willing. Pushing the Irish Wops face against a bandana, wrapped it around the grinder and yanked. The tooth failed to yield to force so “Paddy” used craft and science. It finally came. The operation drew a “standing room only” crowd from all the adjoining stables.

 

A College Football Game Is Mild Stuff Compared To Division Basketball Games

 

Championship Series Started and 305-306 Scrap Was a Nerve-Racker

 

            A college town in the midst of a big football game is a mild, well ordered graveyard of a place compared to the stamping ground of the Metropolitan Division these days of the division basketball championship. The Spirit is running high, higher than it's ever been in such a paradise of prohibition. Buglers and drummers can make more noise than all the collegiate throats east of the Rockies, at full pitch, and when soldiers turn loose to yell-well, consult an ear specialist for repairs. The game the other night at the Auditorium between those doughboy rivals the 305th and 306th Infantry men turned loose more yell and holler and stamp and all round excitement than forty bullfights on the same day with a South American revolution. It was a considerable contest too as all the floor games for the Division Championship promise to be.

 

            At the end of the first half the core was 3-8, and when the second half had made its nerve-racking way for several minutes there wasn't a steady nerve inside the green building-except those possessed by the ten speedy young riflemen who are battling it out on the floor. Col. Vidmers men finally collected one cage more than three-O-Five and the score ended 19-17, with every fellow in Col. Smedbergs outfit of rooters candidates for the insane ward of the Base Hospital. Some demonstration, to use the mild and chaste language of the classics. The engineers, the same evening, got a 21-13 decision from the Ordnance Corps in a fast game at K. of C. Hall.

 

Princess Troubetzkoy Composes “A Soldier's Creed” for 305 Lads

 

Infantrymen Will Carry Copies of Amelie Rives to France

 

            The 305th, in addition to having the only regimental tent in camp and various other items has filed a new claim to distinction. It has a Princess writing poetry about it. Amelle Rives (Princess Troubetzkoy) has composed a poem, “The Soldier's Creed.” For the lads of Three-O-Five. It will be graven on cards and each member will be given a copy along with tinned beef. Condiments, biscuits, another suit and other fighting necessities to carry in the blue bag to France. The poem:

 

            I, a plain American,

            Do believe in God and man ;

            Not the God that fear has made

            Or that bigots have portrayed,

            Ruler by a force restrictive,

            Jealous, wrathful and vindictive,

            But the God of all that's true,

            Lord of spirits born anew.

            He whose service freedom is

            And to those service freedom is

            And whose might is liberty's,

            Freemen, let our wills be His.

            I believe my country stands

            For the highest in all lands,

            For the faith that right is might,

            For the standard that is light,

            For the sword that's aye belonged

            To the righting of the wronged,

            For the truth that makes men see

            Death for right is victory.

            He whose service freedom is

            And whose might is liberty's

            Freemen, let our wills be His.

            I believe the soldiers part

            Is to strive with hand and heart,

            Brain and body, soul and will

            For the conquering of all,

            For the lighting of the blind,

            For the freedom of mankind.

            Till Old Glory be unfurled

            On the ramparts of the world.

            He whose service freedom is

            And Whose might is liberty's

            Freemen, let our wills be his.

Bill Hohenzollern Gets Stretcher in Sanitary Benefit

 

            Benefits may come and go, but talk about the benefit of the Sanitary Train 302, in the Manhattan Opera house, will go on forever. For once iodine swabs and pills were left behind in memories keeping and 772 men for, field hospitals and ambulance companies gave themselves over to a riot of fun and frolic.

 

            New York's ever generous population responded eagerly to the call from the Medicos for a boost to their several meds funds. The big house was filled to overflowing, 3,200 seats sold. As a consequence it is expected that the company fund of each of the wight organizations will be augmented by about $500.

 

            Through the courtesy of the United Booking Office and other individual managers, Capt. Engel and Capt. Armour of the Entertainment Committee were able to present a splendid list of stars. The keith Band of 100 pieced opened the show, follows by Dot and Dimple, child prodigy singers and dancers: George M. Cohan, Eva Shirley, Mullen and Coogan, Edith Day and chorus of the “Going up” company, in her famous “Tickle-to” number; Ted Snyder and company; Gilbert and Friedlander, Violini, the eccentric violinist, and Hackett and Hackett.

 

            The greatest ovations were accorded the acs by the “cut-binder boys” themselves. The retreat scene, closing with two songs by the chorus of eighty voices, received several recalls. Lieut. Hall and company of eight in “School Days” made a huge hit, and the litter drill, under the tutelage of Major Tait, scored a triumph. Kaiser Bill was carried off on the last stretcher to the accompaniment of a doleful dirge sung by the chorus. She captured the house with “The Last Long Mile,” and a song by Private Minotti of 302d Engineers, “America's Military Step.”

 

            Unlimited credit is due every man who assisted in making the project a success. Capts. Engel and Armour were assisted by Sergts. Conlin and O’Brien and Lieut. Hall; Capt. Ross commanded the retreat scene: the chorus was drilled by Ralph Walker of the Y.M.C.A. and Privates Schwartz, Schachne, Schlesinger, Cerina, Freeh, Brown, Cantaluppo, Timmins, Rubenstein, and Sergts. Morehouse, Meisinger, Bann and Butcher helped in many ways. Many other men rendered service in numbers and methods too large and various to mention. Col. Theodore Roosevelt's autographed message on a programme brought $150.

 

Rival 367th R.B. Teams Fight On No Man's Land

 

            Companies D and G, 367th Infantry, in an exciting basketball game made the Y.M.C.A. Building of the colored regiment ring with enthusiasm as these rivals fought heroically for the possession of what seemed to be “No Man's Land.” The end of the regular playing period showed the game 9 to 9. At the end of the extended period of five minutes the score of 11 to 11 told the story of fight for life. The end of the second period found Company D over the top by a margin of 5 points. Company G. though left on “No Man's Land,” fought bravely and to the end.

 

Maggie Teyte Given Rousing Reception

 

            Two thousand men or more enthusiastically welcomed the famous English soprano Maggie Teyte, recently and most of the welcomers were themselves just recently given their initiation into camp. The concerts were arranged by the Y.M.C.A. for the new enlisted men, and was a gale for success from start to finish. Miss Teytes superb vocalization was appreciated to the limit and she was repeatedly recalled. Sergt. David Hockstein, soldier violinist unexcelled, was also on the programme and was given a warm reception by his new mates who recognized the artist in him immediately. The programmes were rendered in the 306th Infantry Y.M.C.A., 5th Avenue and 4th Street, and at the 305th Infantry hut, 5th Avenue and First Street.

 

Bring Big Movie to Entertain Friends

 

            Company A, 306th Machine Gun Battalion, celebrated release from quarantine by entertaining the rest of the Battalion on Monday. Lew Burstein, who formerly was connected with the Griffith interests induction. “The Avenging Conscience,” in which Henry Wallthall plays the leading role. The Fifth Avenue and EIghth STreet hut was crowded to the doors for this offering and it was so popular that the picture was shown later in the week at the big auditorium and at another hut.

 

Battery B, 304th Champs

 

            Battery B 304th, F.A. according to the best sporting dope, has pulled down the regimental supremacy and the privilege of meeting other division teams in the division championship. The score was 31-13. Lineup and summary: Headquarters Company forewards, Cote and Eisenberg: guards, Adelberg and Highbee; centre DOty. Battery B, McGowen and Martin forewards; Sterrit centre: Dobby and Glauber guards. Field baskets, EIsenberg 2; Highbee 2; McGowen 6; Martin 4; Sterrit, Dobby 3. Foul baskets, Highbee 5; Sterrit 3. Referee-Lieut Keeney, Battery B. Umpires-Capt. Kemfner and Lieut. McMasters.

 

Putts from Machine Gunners

 

            The 304th M. G. B. has completed the basketball schedule and is now ready to play their neighbors for the M. G. Battalions championship. SOme lively battles are looked for Cook of Company A has been appointed Captain of the team and the men are practising daily.

 

            The 305th M. G. B.’s crack basketball team is still waiting to play in the Divisional championship and is playing practice games with any teams that will book a game with them. COmpany C defeated COmpany A in a fast and furious game at the K. of C. Hall last wednesday night by the score of 45 to 21. This is the only defeat Company A gas suffered this season. Corp. Schmidts orchestras entertained the audience as usual.

 

            The 304th M. G. B. held a boxing night at the Y Hut and some lively bouts were recorded. They will be there when it comes time to schedule the big finals. In addition to the bouts a five-reel feature was shown and a number of musical numbers were renders. The mascot of Company A is getting fatter every day and very soon Jim will have to ask the supply sergeant to issue a cot to him. How about it Sou?

 

Hats Off To Folks along the 57th Street

 

            An omission in parade accounts is hereby rectified by the Bugler, organ of Company B, 307th:

           

            “Detailed accounts appeared in the newspapers concerning the parade of the Camp Upton men in New York last week. Every phase of the march was discussed and written up, but one incident which will always mean much to those who paraded was hardly remarked upon. The serving of refreshments along the line of March especially on West 57th Street, by the people who were thoughtful of our comforts will long linger in our memories as an indication that our friends are in back of us.”

 

Company C, 308th

 

            Private George Rothenburg aspired to be an actor. Then the WIse Guy informed him that actors very seldom ate. And it was all off.

            How George does love his chow!      

The National Army, it is stated is a very promising army.     

Company C, for instance, is full of promises.           

Corp. Jacob Held is willing to live and die and stand pat on fame that his name was once in the Brooklyn CItizen.       

Private Paul Scagliotti has been pestering the company correspondent to write something about him.           

Sorry we can't oblige you, Paul. The paper won't print that kind of language.

 

305th Begins Volley and Tugging Contests

            Recently the inner company competition in the 305th Infantry. Regiment of volleyball and tug of war for silver loving cups donated by Alexander Taylor & CO., was begun. Companies A and B met, but because of delicacy of rules which could not at the time be settles, their competition Rivalry between promises to be some real sport. Company F over the line twice out of three pulls, entitling Company E to further competition.

 

            In the volleyball contest, Headquarters defaulted to Supply Company; Machine Gun won from the Sanitary Detachment 15-3; D won from C, 15-4: M from H, 15-2: G from L, 15-10. Physical Secretary Wefer of Y.M.C.A. No 37 is running the games.

Show Bayonet Work In N.Y. Hippodrome

Lieut. R. T. Kidde Co. F. 308th, who has made such a success with his bayonet men is at another exhibition at the Hippodrom Sunday. Lieut Kidde and his bayonetta's are in great demand to give exhibitions and whoe be the Germans who come in contact with their steel. First Sergt. John W. Hinden Sergt. Frank S. Gray and Pvt. Thomas Confrey are the men who represent this company in the bayonet exhibitions.

 

Who has The pearls?

            While Miss Scott was visiting Sergt. M. O. Jones, Vet. Hospital No.2, she lost a stickpin containing sixty pearls and asks this notice i ve inserted in Trench and Camps, hoping it may lead to the recovery. It was dropped, she thinks about 6.30 o’clock Sunday evening during the dance at K. of C. Hall. If you have any information-best of all the pin-report it to the K. C. Hall, Upton Boulevard or the 2d and 14th Y. M. C. A. Hut.

 

Depot Brigade Cope

 

            For the first time in the history of the camp, and perhaps of any camp in the country the soldiers were entertained Sunday by a troop of Boy Scouts of No. 165 East 72d Street New York City. The boys marched up from the station to the Third Company, 152d Depot. Brigade, where they were entertained at dinner. Sergt. A. Gelepogien of the Third Company was instrumental in getting the troop to come to camp. After dinner the boys entertained with band music and an exhibition of drill appearing at two huts, where the men, in addition to the music and entertainment were given cigars and cigarettes. Mr. D. J. Theophilatos accompanied the boys from the city, and we are much indebted to him for the entertainment. Scout master P. A. Sioris led the boys in their drill, and P. Periklis, the band leader was the presiding genius of the instrumentalists.

 

The barnyard College girls gave the men the depot brigade a fine entertainment Saturday the programme including singing recitation and (tell it not in Gath) a little intermission, during which the demure dames immediately begin to suffer from a perceptible nervous twitching of her pedal extremities. Sergt. Major Eugene Greenhut sitting across the aisle rose to the occasion like a gentlemen and a scholastic soldier of the Depot Brigade and soon four of five couples were gliding about the few square feet of open space in front of the benches. Yes, the entertainment certainly was a great success.


Lieut. Blakesley battalion team has come through with flying colors and will represent the Depot Brigade in the division championships. The Depot Brigade is particularly unfortunate and under a considerable handicap in having lost most of its star players, the team having organized about half a dozen times in the past two weeks. There are three good weight classes who should go through to the finale in the boxing championships while Lunn the middleweight cook of the Eighth Company should make them all go at his weight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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